Exactly How Much Back Flexibility do you need to do a Perfect Arabesque?

How much back flexibility do you need: It is easy to calculate the minimum back extension or back hyperextension flexibility that is needed.

It is easy to calculate the minimum back extension or back hyperextension flexibility that is needed. The first thing you would need to do is test your active hip extension flexibility. Hip extension combined with a turnout unless you are doing a parallel Arabesque.

It is particularly important to calculate active flexibility because active flexibility is always less than passive flexibility. In other words, if someone were to take your leg when you were lying in the prone position, or face down, and lift it up into the Arabesque position without your spine moving, the leg would come up higher than if you would try to hold it yourself.

How much back flexibility do you need: It is easy to calculate

Scroll down to try a special FREE exercise below which will improve your Arabesque & Attitude Derriere in minutes!

There are exercises called antagonist short-range conditioning exercises which we use in our Arabesque program which will help you to minimize the difference between active and passive flexibility bringing your active flexibility closer to passive flexibility.

Let’s assume that your passive flexibility is 30 degrees, and your active flexibility is 20 degrees so to do a 90-degree Arabesque or leg parallel to the floor, you would need 70 degrees from your back, and this is 70 degrees of active flexibility not passive. 

Again, comparing the active and passive flexibility you might lie down on the floor and do a cobra where your torso is completely vertical, however, if you let go and take your hands off the floor, your torso will come down closer to the floor, showing that your passive flexibility is less.

improve your Arabesque & Attitude Derriere

To do an Arabesque with the completely vertical torso and horizontal working leg you need 70 degrees of active flexibility. You can test your active flexibility by someone holding your legs down or you might be able to do it without somebody holding your legs down depending on the ratio of your torso to leg length. From there you would come up as high as you can and measure that angleYou can use our free Stretch180
app to measure all the angles. It’s simple to use, you just take a picture, and the app will show you the angl
e.

do an Arabesque with the completely vertical torso and horizontal working

Scroll down to try a special FREE exercise below which will improve your Arabesque & Attitude Derriere in minutes!

For 70 degrees active flexibility a person may need between 100 and 120 degrees of passive flexibility and a very trained person might need only about 85 to 90 degrees of passive flexibility for 70 degrees of active flexibility. A person who is very well trained in antagonist short-range condition exercises will have a much smaller discrepancy between active and passive flexibility. You can learn all these techniques in our Arabesque & Attitude Derriere Strength & Flexibility Online Training Program or in our Easy Arabesque & Attitude Derriere Online Certification Training Seminar.

Here is how you can measure your level of Active Flexibility

· Lie down on the floor face down· Without moving your spine lift your leg and hold it· Find the angle, you can use our Stretch180 app to measure your angle· Once you know the angle you can test your passive flexibility and active flexibility and see what that angle is, at the two angles.

Here is how you can measure your level of Active Flexibility

Once you have this information you will see how much more range you need from your back, or perhaps you can get some of that range
from your hips as well. The more range you will get from your hips, the less range you will need from your back and vise-versa.

Want to improve your Arabesque Instantly? Try this Zaichik Stretching Technique called ~Discernment~

SIGN UP BELOW TO GET 2 MORE PROGRESSIONS OF THIS EXERCISE FREE – TO HELP IMPROVE YOUR ARABESQUE!

Perform an Arabesque on both sides and remember the height of your leg. Take pictures if you like.

  • Now do the ~Discernment~ ZST for 3 sets of 3 repetitions.
  • Each repetition has two parts as demonstrated in the video.
  • The first part is called the Leverage and the second part is called the Target.
  • Come up to a cobra position as Leverage, contract your lower back and lift your hips slightly off the floor with a tailbone aiming toward the ceiling, as you drop the hips back down use your hands to press up higher.
  • Do this 3 times pressing up a little bit higher each time.
  • Do 3 sets of 3 repetitions resting for 10 to 30 seconds between each set.

When done try your Arabesque one more time on each side and see the difference!

This exercise has progressions to two more levels, Intermediate and Advanced. Sign up to get two more levels by email.

#mc_embed_signup{background:#fff; clear:left; font:14px Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif; }
/* Add your own Mailchimp form style overrides in your site stylesheet or in this style block.
We recommend moving this block and the preceding CSS link to the HEAD of your HTML file. /

How much back flexibility do you need

Subscribe

indicates required
Email Address *

 

Attitude Derrière or Back Attitude and Arabesque are Ballet/Dance positions usually strength-trained via bar assisted leg lifts into the technique. The flexibility is attained via relaxed stretches.

Attitude Derrière or Back Attitude and Arabesque are Ballet/Dance positions usually strength-trained via bar assisted leg lifts into the technique. The flexibility is attained via relaxed stretches.

This program takes a different approach. The flexibility resistance to these elements comes from medial hip rotators, hip flexors of the lifted leg and flexors of the core. Posterior tilters of the pelvis also offer resistance through the standing leg.

How much back flexibility do you need

This program takes a different approach.The flexibility resistance to these elements comes from medial hip rotators, hip flexors of the lifted leg and flexors of the core. Posterior tilters of the pelvis also offer resistance through the standing leg.

Watch The Anatomical Muscle Animation of The Arabesque and The Attitude Derriere

Unlike the standard time-consuming passive stretch method, this routine employs Kinesiological Stretching techniques. Each of the muscles that prevent the successful Attitude Derriere and Arabesque is separated out and quickly lengthened, using one of its own actions against the other. Because no action is held for long, the stretch reflex is avoided and results are seen right away.

How much back flexibility do you need

Attitude Derriere and Arabesque

Since in Arabesque and Back Attitude it’s the opposite muscles that hold the pose to the one’s being stretched, reciprocal inhibition techniques are intervened with kinesiological stretches to master the skill even faster. You’ll be surprised how fast easy results come using this method.

opposite muscles that hold the pose to the one's being stretched

Get your Arabesque and Attitude Derriere routine today!

Misconception about the “Psoas Tightness” test

Psoas Tightness: Today I am going to talk about some misconceptions about hip flexors flexibility testing even among professionals.

The standard approach to find out if the “Psoas” is tight is to somehow make sure that the Rectus Femoris isn’t (tight).

It’s like having 10 people in the room, and someone broke a vase. You assume if it’s not person 1, it has to be person 10. What about persons 2-9? Why couldn’t they have done it?

Psoas Tightness: Same goes for the “Tight Psoas” Test.

I see physical therapists, massage therapists, fitness trainers place a person on the table in supine position. The table ends under the knees, so that the lower leg hangs off the table. They ask them to pull one knee into the chest.

  • They assume that if the hamstrings rise off the table with bent knee, the culprit is the Rectus Femoris. And if the knee extends and the hamstrings moves lower to the table, it’s Psoas.

The problem with that test is that, just because it’s not the rectus femoris, does not mean that it’s psoas.

Simply because everyone heard of Psoas, does not mean that it’s guilty…There are other muscles that can prevent hip joint from extending:

Psoas Tightness

  • Tensor Fascia Latae
  • Pectineus
  • Sartorius
  • even Psoas’ best bud, the Iliacus.
  • Adductors also flex the hip, but unless there is a serious issue, we can exclude them if the legs are adducted.

The problem is, even if Psoas is tight indeed, one will try to stretch the Psoas by:

  • Either dropping the leg off the table (usually with bent knee), which goes against the (if the leg is bent, it’s the rectus femoris that is tight) principle.
  • Or doing a lunge stretch, which can get multiple muscles in one shot and if any of them are tighter than Psoas, they will block the Psoas from being stretched.

So how does one stretch the Psoas or any other muscle without having another muscle(s) get in the way?
Here is the answer. Every muscle is unique. Every muscle does something different. For example there is no other muscle that does what Psoas does. Same way there is no other muscle that has the same actions as Pectineus, Sartorius, TFL, etc.

Knowing the kinesiology of the body, (Zaichik Stretching Technique, formerly known as Kinesiological Stretching Techniques is based on the science of kinesiology) allows to isolate each muscle and stretch it separately.
Often practitioners spend a long time stretching a muscle, with a technique that does not actually stretch it and they get no results.

  • If you are interested in a very unique Hip Flexors Program, see it here:

Do you want to finally double the flexibility on your hip flexors in just 3-4 weeks?

Psoas Tightness

Flexors of the Hip Joint are often the tightest muscles in the body. Very few people have true length in these muscles.
Did you know that most people who seem well stretched in their hip flexors, are really not?
Can you think of anyone whom you know that has flexible hip flexors?

Perhaps, they can do this:

Perhaps, they can do this

Or Perhaps, they can do this:

Or Perhaps, they can do this
they just have a flexible back

Yes, the hip flexors are naturally so tight, that the body has created many ways to compensate for the tightness.

Does this mean, it’s ok to have tightness in flexors of the hip? Of course not. The problem is, that everyone is trying to stretch them the wrong way, and instead, end up stretching everything else, as you’ve seen demonstrated in the two pictures above.
If you want to stretch these elusive muscles, you need to isolate them:

  • There are 6 hip flexors and 4 adductors and all of them flex the hip.
  • Too much to stretch all at once.
Psoas Tightness

There are more reasons to stretch your hip flexors besides athletics.
1. Tight hip flexors are known to cause lower back pain.
2. Lack of flexibility in this group of muscles put severe pressure on the hamstrings, often causes hamstring pulls.
3. Tension in hip flexors inhibits the work of glutes, making them weaker.
4. Hip flexors rigidity forces the pelvis into a dangerous tilt position.

How do we know what we are talking about? Because, stretching and flexibility education and research is what we’ve been doing for many years.

Stretching the tightest and most problematic muscles is our forte. And we do it absolutely and completely differently than anyone else.This hip flexors program is truly unique. It builds up on the previous one. (Thousands of people have extreme flexibility in their hip flexors from using our regular hip flexors program).This video takes an already very fast and effective Zaichik Stretching Techniques and enhances them with “modalities” for even faster results.

Psoas Tightness

Psoas Tightness
  • This program contains:
    • ZSTs (Zaichik Stretching Techniques) for each of the 10 muscles that flex the hip.
    • Complete Follow Along Program, just press play and do.
    • Modalities: this advanced program contains modified versions of the basic ZSTs, to make them more effective and also harder that’s why you need to have mastered the beginners program.

If you are serious about improving your muscle and joint health and unlocking this piece of the puzzle this program is a must!

Start your flexibility journey Today! Get your Hip Flexor Stretching & Flexibility Program NOW!

Psoas Tightness
Psoas Tightness

Check out the RESULTS customers are getting!

Psoas Tightness

I was really able to speed up my progress and get my over-stretches.I have to thank EasyFlexibility for the Hip Flexors video! I have been dancing since about 6 years old now I am 11. Last year my parents bought me the video and it is amazing. I was really able to speed up my progress and get my over-stretches. It was much less painful too! This is the best I could do a few months ago and the needle is what I can do now!
– Acro Allison

I can feel it, I feel very flexible!I have gone through 2 rounds of the program. This is my split after it. My hip flexors are extremely lose right now. I can feel it, I feel very flexible!
– Gina Belli

Is it possible to perform an Arabesque with a neutral spine?

Arabesque with a neutral spine

#mc_embed_signup{background:#fff; clear:left; font:14px Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif; }

Is it possible to perform an Arabesque with a neutral spine?

Meaning that the hyperextension of the hip will take place from the hip only and there will be no hyper extension of the spine? Is this possible? The answer depends on what tissues you are trying to stretch. Are you looking at the limit of muscular flexibility? Or are you willing to stretch the ligaments?

Scroll down to try a special FREE exercise below which will improve your Arabesque & Attitude Derriere in minutes!

It is accepted that the ligaments resist the hyperextension of the hip between 15 and 30 degrees, with individual variations taken into the account. Of course, there are people with less than 15 degrees of hip hyperextension limited by the ligaments, this can be due to posture, occupational habits, injury, infection, and other reasons. There are also people with naturally laxed ligaments, or specific structure of the hip where the ligaments will restrict in a range past 30 degrees hip hyperextension. In majority of individuals external rotation of the hip will allow for more hyperextension then if the hip was to be kept parallel.

For the sake of this example, let’s assume that your normal turned-out hip hyperextension would be at 30 degrees, that means that to lift a leg parallel to the floor you need another 60 degrees for a total of 90 degrees.

If the spine was to be kept neutral and not hyper extended those extra 60 degrees must come from the flexibility of the hip flexors and adductors, on top of the fact that now the ligaments must be stretched. This is compared to first 30 degrees of hyperextension where ligaments are not stretched, and all that flexibility is dependent on how much you can lengthen your adductors and hip flexor muscles.

Scroll down to try a special FREE exercise below which will improve your Arabesque & Attitude Derriere in minutes!

In theory, it is possible to stretch the ligament to bring the leg to 90 degrees hyperextension. There are ballet dancers and rhythmic gymnast with deep hip hyperextension coming from the flexibility of both the ligaments and the muscles. The safety of such range of motion coming from the stretched ligaments have been debated for a very long time.

The opponents of this type of stretching say that the hip joint becomes very mobile, hyper mobile, and thus, the chance of injury highly increases. The defenders of this type of stretching, point out to the fact that although the ligaments do not hold the joints as tight as if they were shorter, the muscles and tendons do hold the joint in place. It is up to a specific coach, trainer, teacher, or therapist to decide how much flexibility should come from stretching of the ligaments, if any at all, and a proper strength awareness combination to protect the joints, especially in deep ranges of motion.

Now, assuming that the decision was made not to hyperextend the hip through stretching of the ligaments the lacking 60 degrees must now come from the spine and the supporting leg. When there is an anterior pelvic tilt the torso will be inclined forward if the spine were to remain neutral. To prevent that and lift the body up the spine must hyperextend additional 60 degrees. If done correctly, those 60 degrees are spread out through multiple
joints in the back. And of course, because of the anterior tilt there will be a stretch in the supporting leg and the flexion of the supporting hip joint.

So, in short, it is possible to hyperextend the hip without hyperextending the spine. However, there are risks involved and for that reason most Arabesque and Attitude Derriere techniques involve a combination of hip hyperextension and spinal hyperextension.

Want to improve your Arabesque Instantly? Try this Zaichik Stretching Technique called ~Discernment~

SIGN UP BELOW TO GET 2 MORE PROGRESSIONS OF THIS EXERCISE FREE – TO HELP IMPROVE YOUR ARABESQUE!

Arabesque with a neutral spine

Perform an Arabesque on both sides and remember the height of your leg. Take pictures if you like.

  • Now do the ~Discernment~ ZST for 3 sets of 3 repetitions.
  • Each repetition has two parts as demonstrated in the video.
  • The first part is called the Leverage and the second part is called the Target.
  • Come up to a cobra position as Leverage, contract your lower back and lift your hips slightly off the floor with a tailbone aiming toward the ceiling, as you drop the hips back down use your hands to press up higher.
  • Do this 3 times pressing up a little bit higher each time.
  • Do 3 sets of 3 repetitions resting for 10 to 30 seconds between each set.

When done try your Arabesque one more time on each side and see the difference!

This exercise has progressions to two more levels, Intermediate and Advanced. Sign up to get two more levels by email.

Subscribe

indicates required
Email Address *

 

Arabesque with a neutral spine

 

Attitude Derrière or Back Attitude and Arabesque are Ballet/Dance positions usually strength trained via bar assisted leg lifts into the technique. The flexibility is attained via relaxed stretches.

This program takes a different approach.The flexibility resistance to these elements comes from medial hip rotators, hip flexors of the lifted leg and flexors of the core. Posterior tilters of the pelvis also offer resistance through the standing leg.

Arabesque with a neutral spine

Arabesque with a neutral spine

Watch The Anatomical Muscle Animation of The Arabesque and The Attitude Derriere

Unlike the standard time consuming passive stretch method, this routine employs Kinesiological Stretching techniques. Each of the muscles that prevent the successful Attitude Derriere and Arabesque is separated out and quickly lengthened, using one of its own actions against the other. Because no action is held for long, the stretch reflex is avoided and results are seen right away.

Arabesque with a neutral spine

Since in Arabesque and Back Attitude it’s the opposite muscles that hold the pose to the one’s being stretched, reciprocal inhibition techniques are intervened with kinesiological stretches to master the skill even faster. You’ll be surprised how fast easy results come using this method.

Read more: https://easyflexibilityblog.com/2022/01/24/developpe-a-la-seconde-muscle-anatomy/

Arabesque with a neutral spine

Get your Arabesque and Attitude Derriere routine today!

Arabesque with a neutral spine

Have you tried the exercise?

Have you tried the exercise

If not, look at last week’s article here.

How was it?

Did you face any of these commonly occurring issues?

The number one problem when doing a hip turnout properly through the hips is the same as in when doing the Turnout Incline Plane (TIP) on the Blocks:

Cramping in the hips

Most people assume that cramping is lack of strength. However, that is frequently not the case. Under normal conditions the given muscles are too strong to cramp, especially in dancers. More frequently, it’s lack of flexibility. Here is why. Let’s take ourselves out of the situation and observe another exercise as an example. This example will allow us to see what is going on clearly and without prejudice.

Have you tried the exercise

Developpe Devant– try to hold this position for a few seconds and you might get a cramp in your quadriceps. Why? After all, your quads are strong enough to do hundreds of Plies, without tiring. And they can’t lift your lower leg? Of course they can. The problem is the hamstrings are so tight that they make the work of the quadriceps impossible, causing them to cramp.

Same goes for the Turnout Incline Plane (TIP) on the Blocks. The antagonists to lateral rotators of the hip may just be too tight. Because the legs are in the hip extension position we have to see kinesiologicaly who is at fault here. The muscles that turn the hip in and flex the hip of course. Can you guess what those muscles are?

You will get the answer in tomorrow’s newsletter. Stay tuned.

Read more;https://easyflexibilityblog.com/

Have you tried the exercise

Let us show you how you can dramatically improve your Turn Out, steadily, safely, painlessly and quickly with the use of the ZST

The Ballet Turnout program contains specific turn out warm-up & conditioning techniques

The routine begins with mobility exercises, followed by specific warmup and conditioning techniques that will prepare your body for the special stretching  techniques that follow. Not only that, these exercises will also make your newly gained flexibility permanent, they will speed up flexibility gains as well as make you strong and in control of your body. You’ll feel lighter than ever!Click here to learn more about our Ballet Turnout program!

Have you tried the exercise

Have you tried the exercise

Check out what other customers are saying about the Ballet Turnout program!

Don’t Be Fooled By the Flexors!

Fooled By the Flexors: Did you try it?

Fooled By the Flexors: I am going to guess that 8/10 of yoga practitioners complained about a ‘cramp in their hip?’ If this sounds familiar- then I could be about to solve your problem! If not, then you are about to learn a fantastic way to overcome tight hip flexors.

Fooled By the Flexors
Fooled By the Flexors

When completing a seated pike stretch with your legs straight out in front of you past 70 degrees of flexion, the stretch from the adductor magnus ischial fibers and adductor longus is not that great.

So contrary to your protests- a cramp in an adductor is not because of adductors stretching, but the tightness of many other muscles. Constricted hip extensors, lateral hamstrings, and medial rotators are so tight that to complete full flexion, the flexors go into spasms.

Fooled By the Flexors

Adductors are flexors of the hip, thus a spasm felt in the adductors is due to lack of flexibility in the extensors, rather than weakness in the flexors. So hip flexors- you don’t fool us! Here is a brilliant way to ensure your are able to maximize the stretching of their hamstrings while minimizing spasms and cramps.

The exercise named ~PEACE~ is a stretch that increases the range of movement at the hip joint and the flexibility of the hamstrings. The flexion at the hip in this position while laying down on the floor is mirrored with the extension at the knee and hip.

Fooled By the Flexors

The Zaichik Stretching Technique ~PEACE~ uses a ‘target, target, leverage, leverage’ method. It is fantastic technique to see instant results. For young learners it can almost look like magic! Students are amazed at how they have been able to see such drastic differences in their flexibility levels.

Fooled By the Flexors

By highlighting the hamstrings in this stretch, we take pressure away from the hip flexors as a result. We can see when lifting single leg that the psoas and iliacus work best when the quadriceps approach the torso at a tighter angle. Check out the pictures below if you require more guidance on coaching your gymnasts.

Look at the explanation in the video

~PEACE~

Fooled By the Flexors

Leverage: bending the knee
Target: extending the leg with greater hip flexion

Step 1:

Lay down on your back and pull one leg into your chest

Step 2:

Extend your knee until you feel the stretch.

Step 3:

Come back from your knee and extend your leg. Every time you extend your leg straight you come closer and closer to the floor over your head with your foot through flexion of the hip joint.

Although this stretch mainly works on the hamstrings, the gluteus maximus, posterior gluteus medius fibers, piriformis and ischial adductor magnus are also being worked. It is vitally important to ensure your gymnasts are thoroughly warmed up for this, and as the video suggests, never working to ‘complete failure’.

Following this simple, yet extremely effective method of stretching, the ‘cramping’ or spasms in the flexors will soon be a thing of the past!

There are countless skills in gymnastics that require some form of pike fold, or full split. This stretch is one to remember and continually refer back to. If you have a gymnast that is struggling to hit their 180’ split mark, or is failing to grasp a skill because of an open pike position- use this drill/ method of stretching!

Get started today with our Hamstrings Double Forward Bending program below! Click on the BUY NOW button!

Fooled By the Flexors

Fooled By
buy now