Why do muscles shake during a stretching workout?

why do muscles shake during a stretching workout?

I got this question a few times: “Why do muscles shake during a stretching workout” and decided to answer it in today’s article. Muscles can shake during or after a stretching exercise just like they can shake during a strength training exercise.

Strength Training vs Stretching Workout – Understand why your muscles shake

Although, you want to know why your muscles shake during a stretching workout. It is first important to understand why your muscles shake during strength training exercises. Knowing this, will help you to understand the reason why your muscles shake during a stretching workout.

Although, you want to know why your muscles shake during a stretching workout. It is first important to understand why your muscles shake during strength training exercises. Knowing this, will help you to understand the reason why your muscles shake during a stretching workout.  

You may notice that if you lift to failure, meaning that you do as many repetitions as you can until you can’t do anymore, your muscles may shake. If you lift very heavy, even a few repetitions, again you may experience shaking.

I can bore you with the science behind it. But, the bottom line is this, if your muscles shake it means that you are pushing your body beyond what it is used to. Muscles shaking during a strength training workout can be neurological. Stemming from your nervous system trying to recruit as many model units as possible to complete the task. Muscles shaking during a strength training workout can also be due to nutrient deficiencies, dehydration, low blood sugar, etc., but I personally do not see that very often.

The Stretch Reflex – Reason why your muscles shake during a stretching workout.

Now let’s talk about why the muscles shake during a stretching workout. The reason is the same but in a slightly different context.  When you do a passive relaxed stretch such as in yoga and try to force stretch, meaning go deep beyond your comfort level, the muscles are not going to respond well and there’s going to be what is known as a “stretch reflex”. The stretch reflex is the reason why most people’s muscles shake during a stretching workout.

The Stretch Reflex muscles shaking during stretching workout

When you do a passive relaxed stretch such as in yoga and try to force stretch, meaning go deep beyond your comfort level, the muscles are not going to respond well and there’s going to be what is known as a “stretch reflex”. The stretch reflex is the reason why most people’s muscles shake during a stretching workout

So, what happens during a stretch reflex?  The muscles contract and they do not want to allow the stretch to go deeper. The harder you pull the more the muscles contract. When they contract as much as possible, they begin to shake!

The same thing happens when you are doing a stretching exercise. During a stretching exercise your muscles contract and you’re trying to stretch them but they’re trying to contract. This has always been my issue with relaxed stretching, they are good for many things but not so great for flexibility gains.

Passive stretching does not build flexibility

I personally do not experience muscles shaking during a stretching workout, and neither do any of the EasyFlexibility practitioners, because I do not use relaxed stretches or passive stretches for flexibility. I have given up doing that many years ago even before I came up with the concept of the Zaichik Stretching Techniques.

Zaichik Stretching Techniques (ZST’s), as you may already know, do not produce the stretch reflex. Thus, your muscles will not shake during a stretching workout with the ZST’s. In ZST’s there is no holding this constant movement, and the stretch reflex does not set in. Because of this the muscles don’t get a chance to start opposing and eventually shaking thereby eliminating muscle shaking during a stretching workout.

I’m going to give my personal opinion here. I’m not a fan of muscle shaking during strength exercises. And I’m even more against muscles shaking during stretching exercises.  To me muscles shaking during strength exercises means that I am doing too much. But then again, I’m not a competitive athlete so I’m only speaking for myself.  

I personally do not experience muscles shaking during a stretching workout, because I do not use relaxed stretches or passive stretches for flexibility. I have given up doing that many years ago even before I came up with the concept of the Zaichik Stretching Techniques.

If you are going to use passive relaxed stretches for flexibility gains you have to do them for a short period of time, many times. Instead of sitting there and forcing the stretch. Because, there is a very high chance, that if you fight with your muscles, you can injure them. And if you don’t injure your muscles right away you may just make them sore and still not gain any flexibility.

From the many years of research that I have done, and over 30 years of experience in the field of flexibility. I can tell you this with absolute certainty. That if your primary goal is to get flexible and retain your flexibility. Continuing to use passive relaxed stretches, especially to the point of muscle shaking, is not an optimal way of developing flexibility.

Relaxed Passive stretches may lead to Injuries if used the wrong way!

If you are lucky enough to not get injured the first time when you fight with your muscles. And continue to force stretch. Your muscles will begin shaking during a stretching workout. Eventually they will fatigue and let you get a little bit more flexible. But, your poor muscles will be so sore that you won’t be able to do anymore stretches for a while. This will of course set you back for a certain amount of time. And if you don’t wait until you are not sore anymore and keep on stretching, you are almost guaranteed to injure a muscle or a tendon. Not to mention that you will again experience muscles shaking during a stretching workout. Which is what you are trying to avoid in the first place!

I’m going to make this point again about the passive relaxed stretches. Passive relaxed stretches should be used for what they have been intended for. That is to calm down the nervous system, and help the body relax after a workout. From the many years of research that I have done, and over 30 years of experience in the field of flexibility. I can tell you this with absolute certainty. That if your primary goal is to get flexible and retain your flexibility. Continuing to use passive relaxed stretches, especially to the point of muscle shaking, is not an optimal way of developing flexibility.

- Paul Zaichik is an Exercise Science Expert, author of multitude of books, and the creator of Zaichik Stretching Technique (formerly known as Kinesiological Stretching Technique). His specialty is flexibility training as well as body weight conditioning. His innovative method is designed to have maximum carry over into specific athletic techniques. Paul is the author of books and DVD’s on the topic of flexibility, martial arts and bodyweight training. Over the years, Paul Zaichik has worked with a variety of individuals including athletes, entertainers, and military personnel. His ElasticSteel Method of Athletic Conditioning. Zaichik Stretching Techniques and programs are used worldwide by both professional and amateurs with great success. For more information about the Zaichik Stretching Techniques please visit <a href="http://www.EasyFlexibility.com">www.EasyFlexibility.com</a>
– Paul Zaichik is an Exercise Science Expert, author of multitude of books, and the creator of Zaichik Stretching Technique (formerly known as Kinesiological Stretching Technique). His specialty is flexibility training as well as body weight conditioning. His innovative method is designed to have maximum carry over into specific athletic techniques. Paul is the author of books and DVD’s on the topic of flexibility, martial arts and bodyweight training. Over the years, Paul Zaichik has worked with a variety of individuals including athletes, entertainers, and military personnel. His ElasticSteel Method of Athletic Conditioning. Zaichik Stretching Techniques and programs are used worldwide by both professional and amateurs with great success. For more information about the Zaichik Stretching Techniques please visit www.EasyFlexibility.com

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High Front Kick Anatomy

A Front Kick anatomy is a kick used by martial artists around the globe in which the knee is lifted forward while keeping the foot and shin either dropping freely or pulled to the hip, and then straightening the leg in front of the executor and striking the target. After striking the target, the leg is retracted back to avoid grappling by the opponent.

This kick anatomy requires straight and balanced upper body. Strength as well as flexibility are important in many muscle groups of the body specially of the leg and core. The muscles are needed to be conditioned in correct progression. You can check out our kicking programs about Front Kick where you are taught by professionals the exact exercises to condition your muscles. 

In this article, we are going to talk about the muscles involved during the execution of a High Front Kick, because without the knowledge of the muscles, you can not start working on the kick efficiently. 

Kicking Leg Muscles Contracting to Bring The Knee Up (while chambering the kick)

Tensor Fascia Lata:

kick Tensor Fascia Latae

Tensor Fascia Lata is an internal rotator as well as abductor of the leg. During Front Kick’s execution, it will bring the knee up and help in the chambering of the kick.

Psoas:

PSOAS

Psoas muscles are flexors of the thigh at hip joint and while executing the Front Kick, they will contract to bring the knee up.

Iliacus:

Iliacus

Iliacus works with Psoas muscles in flexing the thigh. So, it is also contracting.

Pectineus:

Kick Anatomy pectineus

Pectineus is another muscle of anterior compartment whose main function is to flex the thigh at the hip joint. Here, it is also contracting.

Rectus Femoris:

Rectus Femorus

Rectus Femoris is another flexor of the leg at hip joint that will ne contracting here.

Sartorius kick Anatomy:

Sartorius

Sartorius, just like other muscles contracting to bring the knee up, is also a flexor of the thigh.

Kicking Leg Muscles Contracting to Flex The Knee (while chambering the kick)

Hamstrings:

Hamstrings

While chambering the kick, Hamstrings, that are the flexors of the knee, will contract to flex the knee.

Gastrocnemius kick Anatomy:

Gastrocnemius kick Anatomy:

Gastrocnemius is a Calf muscle that is also a flexor of the knee and it will also contract during chambering the kick. 

Kicking Leg Muscles Stretching (while chambering the kick)

Three Head of Quadriceps: 

Three heads of Quadriceps except the Rectus Femoris will be stretched while chambering the kick because they act as extensors of the knee.

Gluteus Maximus:

Gluteus Maximus is an extensor of the thigh at hip joint so it will also be lengthening while the kick is being chambered.

Adductor Magnus (ischial fibers):

Adductor Magnus

The Ischial Fibers of Adductor Magnus act as extensors of the thigh unlike it’s other part so they will be stretching. 

Supporting Leg Muscles Contracting

Adductors Kick Anatomy:

adductors

Adductors like Adductor Magnus, Adductor Longus, Adductor Brevis and Gracilis will contract eccentrically since the pelvis is tilted up on the kicking side.

Core Muscles Contracting

Abdominals (right side):

core

The Abdominals main function is flexion of the core and if acting on one side, flex the trunk laterally at that side. As the pelvis is tilted at right side, only the right sided Abdominals will contract.

Kicking Leg Muscles Contracting (while throwing the kick)

Three Heads of Quadriceps:

kicking leg

Unlike during chambering of the kick, the three heads of Quadriceps will be contracting during throwing the kick because it requires the extension of the knee and Quadriceps contract to provide the extension.

Also Read More About: https://easyflexibilityblog.com/category/splits/

Kicking Leg Muscles Lengthening (while throwing the kick)

Hamstrings Kick Anatomy:

Hamstrings Kick Anatomy

Hamstrings will be lengthening while kick is being thrown as they are flexors of the knee and the opposite is happening unlike what happened during chambering the kick.

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Russian Split Anatomy

Russian Split, also known as Horizontal or Saddle Split, is one of the most famous pylon tricks in the world and perhaps one of the most beautiful splits. Russian Split anatomy is named so because it first began to appear first in the competition by Russian Pole Dancers.

It is an extremely complex move to execute and requires a lot of practice and correct progression. The complexity comes from the fact that you need not only a good stretch but also strong arms to keep your body in a horizontal position. You also need to make sure that the supporting leg does not slip. In Russian Split anatomy, your legs spread widely horizontally so that your hips can sink deeply into the floor. 

So, in order to perfect it, you need to focus on daily stretches that improve the flexibility of restricting muscles discussed later in the article. It is important to work on the Russian Split in the correct progression. 

So, let’s start with the muscles behind the Russian Split anatomy.

Muscles Lengthening in the leg proximal to the pole

Russian Split Anatomy Hamstrings:

Hamstrings Russian Split

Hamstrings are the extensors of the leg at the hip joint but the leg proximal to the pole in Russian Split is hyper flexed and that is why the Hamstrings are being lengthened here.

Adductor Magnus (ischial fibers):

Russian Adductor magnus

The Ischial fibers of Adductor Magnus act just like Hamstrings as extensors of the leg at the hip joint that will also be stretched while executing the Russian Split anatomy.

Gluteus Maximus:

Russian Gluteus Anatomy

Another extensor of the hip will also be lengthening in the proximal leg.

Piriformis:

Russian Piriformis Splits

This muscle abducts the leg during hip flexion and that is why it is also being stretched in the proximal leg.

Gluteus Medius (posterior fibers):

Medius Posterior Fiberas Russian

The posterior fibers of Gluteus Medius also act as extensors of the thigh and so, are stretching during the Russian Split in the proximal leg.

Muscles Lengthening in the leg distal to the pole – Russian Split Anatomy

Psoas Major:

Russian Psoas Major

Psoas Major is a major flexor of the thigh at the hip joint and as we can see, the distal leg is extended, so Psoas Major is lengthening in the distal leg.

Iliacus:

Iliacus Russian

Rectus Femoris assists the Iliopsoas in flexion of the leg. It also gets stretched due to being a flexor.

Sartorius:

Russian Split Anatomy

Sartorius is both a hip and knee flexor and as we know both hip and knee are extended in the distal leg so it will be lengthened strongly.

Pectineus: A Best Russian Split Anatomy

Russian Split Anatomy

Pectineus when contracts, flexes and adducts the leg at the hip joint. This is why it is stretching in the distal leg.

Tensor Fascia Latae:

Russian Split Anatomy

Tensor Fascia Latae will be lengthening in the distal leg due it’s one of the functions of being a flexor of the hip joint.

Adductor Magnus:

Russian Split Anatomy

It is a prime adductor of the leg and in the distal leg, it will be restricting the movement important for the Russian Split anatomy thus, it will be lengthening.

Adductor Longus:

Russian Split Anatomy

The Adductor Longus will also get lengthened.

Adductor Brevis:

Russian Split Anatomy

Like the other Adductors, this small adductor muscle is also being stretched in the distal leg.

Gracilis:

Russian Split Anatomy

Gracilis is a long, strap-like muscle that provides strong adduction and thus, is stretching in the distal leg.

Dorsiflexion:

Russian Split Anatomy

As the feet are in a plantarflexed position, the Dorsiflexors are being lengthened. 

Muscles stabilizing the position

Flexors of the fingers:

Russian Split Anatomy

The flexors of the fingers play a very crucial role in stabilizing the position as they help in making a stronger grip so that the practitioner doesn’t slip down.

Soleus:

Russian Split Anatomy

Soleus assists in plantarflexion of the foot and here it will help the foot of the proximal leg to come into a position that will help in stabilizing the position.

Gastrocnemius:

 Gastrocnmius Russian Splits

The gastrocnemius is the other plantar flexor of the foot that will position the foot of the proximal leg on the pole so that the position can be stabilized.

Rectus Abdominis:

Russian Rectus splits

Prime flexors of the trunk will help to defy the gravitational pull and keep the core in a horizontal position.

Obliques:

Russian Obliques Splits

The Obliques are the flexors of the trunk if acting bilaterally and they will help in opposing the downward movement of the body and resist the gravity.

Triceps:

Russian Triceps split

Triceps are the extensors of the forearm that will make sure that the forearm stays extended on one side. It also helps in stabilizing the position.

Pectoralis Major (sternal):

Sternal Russian Split

The sternal head of Pectoralis Major acts as an adductor that will work with some other muscles in adducting the arms so that the pole can be held and hence, stabilizing the position of Russian Split.

Latissimus Dorsi:

Russian Split Latissimus

Latissimus Dorsi is a big muscle that will produce adduction and internal rotation of the arms. This assists in stabilizing the position.

Teres Major:

Teres Major Split Russian

Teres Major acts as an internal rotator and adductor of the arms and it will be contracting on both sides to produce the internal rotation and thus, stabilizing the position.

Rhomboids:

Rhomboids Russian Split

Rhomboids retract, rotate, and elevate the scapula which are very important movements in stabilizing the position of the Russian Split.

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Medial Russian Split

Cheerleading Scorpion Pose Anatomy

The Scorpion Pose is a beautiful cheerleading flyer position and also one of the most difficult ones. The Flyer holds the top of her foot with both hands and pull the foot up towards her head behind her. Her chest should be up and she should be looking at the crowd. The Scorpion is performed facing the side so that the crowd can see the beautiful extension of the leg.

The Scorpion requires a cheerleader to have a tremendous amount of body flexibility as well as be able to maintain balance on one leg. The Scorpion is an advanced level stunt that requires flexibility in order to hold the position. Even after mastering the Scorpion, it is necessary to keep working on the flexibility otherwise you may quickly lose it. This position calls for deep flexibility of the hip flexors and flexors of the spine. Moderate hamstrings flexibility of the supporting leg is called up on as well. The pose can be helped by having flexible shoulder extensors. In Yoga, this pose is known to benefit the lungs, as well as many other organs and structures.

Due to so many areas of concentration, many people find this pose rather challenging. The reason being incorrect training. The most common way to train this pose is to force the body into it. This is often achieved by assuming a position closely resembling it and pulling as hard as possible for as long as possible, hoping for the results to come one day. Kinesiological stretching takes a different approach.

The knowledge of the muscles contracting and lengthening during the Scorpion is important before you start practising on this technique.

Supporting leg’s muscles contracting while lengthening

Hamstrings Scorpion Pose:

Scorpion Pose Hamstrings Muscles

Hamstrings contract to extend the thigh at the hip joint. During the execution of the Scorpion Pose, it will be contracting while lengthening in the supporting leg.

Gluteus Medius:

Scorpion Pose Gluteus Medius

Gluteus Medius is a prime mover of abduction at the hip joint that also acts as flexor of the hip and its posterior fibers act as extensors of the hip. It is also being contracted while lengthening.

Gluteus Minimus:

Scorpion Pose Mimimus

Works just the same as Gluteus Minimus. Thus, it is also contracting while lengthening in the supporting leg.

Adductor Magnus (ischial fibers):

Scorpion Pose Ischial Fibers

Ischial fibers of Adductor Magnus act as Hamstrings and produce extension of the leg at the hip joint. 

Lifted Leg’s muscles contracting while lengthening

Quadriceps Scorpion Pose:

Scorpion Pose Quadriceps

Quadriceps work with Iliopsoas to produce flexion of the leg at hip joint. But the lifted leg is hyperextended during Pose and that is why Quadriceps are contracting while lengthening.

Iliacus:

Scorpion Pose Illiacus

Just as the Quadriceps, Iliacus is also a flexor of the hip joint and it will also be contracting while lengthening.

Psoas:

Scorpion Pose Psoas

Psoas is a prime flexor of the thigh. The hyperextension of the leg will obviously stretch it.

Tensor Fascia Latae:

Scorpion Pose Tensor

Tensor Fascia Latae is a gluteal muscle that helps in flexion of the thigh at hip joint. Because of this reason, it will also be contracting while being lengthened.

Sartorius:

Scorpion Pose Sartorius

Sartorius is both a hip and knee flexor so it will also be included in the group of muscles contracting while lengthening.

Gracilis:

Scorpion Pose Gracilis

Gracilis is a strong adductor of the leg and the Scorpion Pose will stretch it as well in the lifted leg.

Adductor Magnus:

Scorpion Pose Mangnu

Adductor Magnus is a prime adductor of the leg and just like Gracilis, it is also being contracted while lengthening.

Adductor Longus:

Scorpion Pose Adductor Longus

Adductor Longus does the same action as Adductor Magnus and undergoes same contraction while lengthening in the lifted leg.

Adductor Brevis:

Scorpion Pose Adductor Brevis

Adductor Brevis is another adductor that will be contracting while lengthening.

Upper body’s muscles contracting while lengthening

Rhomboids:

Scorpion Pose Rhomboids

Rhomboids help in retraction and elevation of scapula. It is also one of the muscles that will be contracting while lengthening during the Scorpion.

Pectoralis Major:

Scorpion Pose Pectoralis Major

Pectoralis Major causes adduction and depression of the arm and exactly the opposite is happening in the Scorpion Pose and so it is contracting while lengthening.

Pectoralis Minor:

Scorpion Pose Pectoralis Minor

Pectoralis Minor draws the Scapula anteroinferiorly and is being contracted while stretching.

Triceps:

Scorpion Pose Triceps

Triceps act as extensors of the forearm but here the forearm is contracted so it is contracting while lengthening as well.

Latissimus Dorsi:

Scorpion Pose Lattisimus Dorsi

Latissimus Dorsi works with other muscles to produce adduction and medial rotation of the arm. Hence, it is contracting while lengthening.

Posterior Deltoid:

Scorpion Pose Posterior Deltoid

Posterior Deltoid helps in extension and horizontal abduction of the arm. It is also contracting while lengthening.

Core’s muscles contracting while lengthening

Rectus Abdominis:

Scorpion Pose Rectus Abdominis

Rectus Abdominis is a strong flexor of the trunk. The trunk can be seen in extended position and thus, Rectus Abdominis is being contracted while lengthening.

Internal Oblique:

Scorpion Pose Internal Obliques

Internal Oblique when contracting bilaterally, produces flexion of the trunk thus lengthening.

External Oblique:

Scorpion Pose External Obliques

External Oblique is another flexor of the trunk contracting while lengthening during the execution of Scorpion.

Psoas Minor:

Scorpion Pose Psoas Minor

Psoas Minor assists in trunk flexion and here, it will be contracting while lengthening.

Supporting Leg’s muscles contracting to hold the position

Quadriceps:

Scorpion Pose Quadriceps

Quadriceps are flexors of the thigh at the hip joint. It will be contracting to hold the position and maintain balance.

Tensor Fascia Latae:

Scorpion Pose Tensor Fascia

Tensor Fascia Latae is a flexor of the leg as well as an abductor, also contracting to hold the position.

Lower leg and foot muscles:

Scorpion Pose leg and foot muscles

Lower leg and foot muscles like plantarflexors and dorsiflexors are also involved in holding the position.

Lifted Leg’s muscles contracting to hold the position

Gluteus Maximus:

Scorpion Pose Gluteus Maximus

Gluteus Maximus assists in extension of the leg and it is specially important during the Pose in the lifted leg as it is hyperextending. 

Hamstrings Scorpion Pose:

Hamstrings

Hamstrings are prime extensors of the thigh so they are also contracting to hold the position.

Soleus Scorpion Pose:

 soleus

Soleus is a plantarflexor of the foot and it can be seen in the picture that the lifted foot is plantarflexed so, Soleus is contracting.

Gastrocnemius:

Gastroncnemius

Gastrocnemius is another plantarflexor of the foot that will be contracting to hold the position.

Core’s muscles contracting to hold the position

Spinal Extensors:

Spinal Extensors

To lift the chest up, the Spinal Extensors need to contract that will be extending the spine against gravity. 

Upper body’s muscles contracting to hold the position

Serratus Anterior:

Serratus Anterior

Serratus Anterior protracts and upwardly rotates the scapula and also plays a role in overhead abduction and this is a very important movement to hold the position in Scorpion Pose

Trapizeus:

 Trapezius

Trapizeus is a large muscle. The function of the trapezius is to stabilize and move the scapula. The upper fibers can elevate and upwardly rotate the scapula and extend the neck. The middle fibers adduct (retract) the scapula. It will contract to hold the position.

Scorpion Pose

Infraspinatus:

Infraspinatus

It is a rotator cuff muscle that helps in external rotation of the arm and stabilizes the shoulder joint. Here especially, it will help in holding the position.

Scorpion Pose

Teres Minor:

Teres Minor

Teres Minor is another rotator cuff muscle that not only stabilizes the shoulder joint but also externally rotates the arm.

Scorpion Pose

Anterior Deltoid:

Anterior

Anterior Deltoid causes the flexion of the arm anteriorly and it will be assisting only when getting into the position of Scorpion.

Middle Deltoid Scorpion Pose:

Middle Deltoid

Middle Deltoid helps in abduction of the arm and also assisting only when getting into position.

Also Read more about: https://easyflexibilityblog.com/category/splits/

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Full Locust

Heel Stretch Anatomy

Heel Stretch is an advanced cheerleading stunt performed by flyers while balancing on one foot. Although it sounds like a warm-up stretch, it is actually a move that requires a lot of strength and flexibility. The Heel Stretch requires some time and practice to master but once you have got it, it will look impressive and effortless.

You can practice heel stretch cheerleading stunts while standing on solid ground. Stand on your right leg, then kick your left leg as high into the air as you can, catching your heel and pulling your leg into your body. If you have the balance, coordination and flexibility to perform the exercise on the floor, chances are you’ll have no problem learning the actual stunt. If you find that your major hindrance to performance is your flexibility, spend some time stretching.

The muscles that are contracting during the Heel Stretch should be stronger in order to hold the position and those that are lengthening or stretching require flexibility so that they may not hinder the movement. All those muscles involved in Heel Stretch are explained below so you do have enough knowledge to start practicing Heel Stretch.

Muscles Lengthening (Lifted Leg)

Biceps Femoris:

Stretch Bicaps

Biceps Femoris is one of the Hamstring muscles that is involved in extension of the leg at the hip joint. As the lifted leg is hyper-flexed, it is being lengthened strongly.

Semitendinosus :

Heel Semitendenouses

Semitendinosus is another Hamstring muscle that produces extension of the leg and here it is stretching.

Semimembranosus:

Heel Semi membranouses

The third and the last one of the Hamstring muscles that is also being stretched in the lifted leg.

Adductor Magnus (ischial fibers):

Aductor Stretch

Ischial fibers of Adductor Magnus as discussed many times work as extensors of the leg, so just like Hamstrings they also are lengthening.

Piriformis:

Heel Periformis

Piriformis is an external rotator and an abductor of the leg that is also getting stretched in the lifted leg.

Gluteus Maximus:

Heel Stretch Glutesmaximus

Gluteus Maximus is a major extensor of the hip joint and thus, is being lengthened.

Gluteus Medius (posterior fibers):

Heel Stretch Glutes Medius

The posterior fibers of Gluteus Medius contract to produce hip extension, therefore during the Heel Stretch, they lengthen in the lifted leg.

Muscles Lengthening (Standing Leg)

Psoas:

Heel Stretch Psoas

Psoas is a major flexor of the hip joint that works with Iliacus. The standing leg needs to be extended in order to support the body weight so Psoas is lengthening.

Iliacus:

Heel Stretch Iliacus

As discussed above, Iliacus is also a flexor of the hip joint that is being stretched in Heel Stretch.

Adductor Magnus:

Adductor Magnus Heel Stretch

Adductor Magnus in addition to being an adductor, also involved in hip flexion and thus, gets stretched in the standing leg during Heel Stretch.

Adductor Brevis:

Heel Stretch Brevis

It also acts as a flexor of the thigh in addition to being an adductor. Thus, gets lengthened.

Adductor Longus:

Heel Stretch Longus

Also getting lengthened in the standing leg whole performing the Heel Stretch due to being a flexor of the thigh.

Gracilis:

Gracillis

It is a strong adductor of the leg and also plays a small role in flexing the thigh so, is stretching.

Pectineus:

Heel Stretch Leg Gracilis

It is another flexor and adductor of the thigh. So, as seen above, the same happens to it.

Muscles Contracting to stabilize the Lifted Leg

Psoas:

Heel StretchLeg Posas

The lifted leg has to hyper-flexed during the Heel Stretch and it needs stabilization. The hip flexors like Psoas helps in achieving this feat. 

Iliacus:

leg power

Works along with Psoas to stabilize the lifted leg.

Rectus Femoris:

Heel Stretch

Rectus Femoris is one of the Quadriceps that contracts in the lifted leg to cause flexion and stabilizes the leg.

Quadriceps Vastii:

Heel Stretch

Quadriceps Vastii has also a role in leg’s flexion at hip joint.

Tensor Fascia Latae:

Tensor Fasci Latae

This gluteal muscle also performs the role of flexing the thigh at the hip joint thus stabilizing the lifted leg.

Plantar Flexors:

Plnatar Flexors

Plantar flexors contract to produce plantarflexion and that is import movement to reduce tension in the lower leg region.

Muscles Contracting to stabilize the Standing Leg

Iliopsoas:

Heel Stretch

Iliopsoas are flexors of the leg and in the standing leg they contract to make sure the standing leg doesn’t get hyperextended and by this, maintains balance.

All Adductors and Pectineus:

Heel Stretch Pectinus

All Adductors in addition to being adductors also perform the function of hip flexors and Pectineus is also a flexor so they also maintain the position of the standing leg.

Rectus Femoris:

Rectus Femoris

Rectus Femoris is another flexor of the hip so it also helps in stabilizing the standing leg.

Quadriceps Vastii:

Quadriceps Vastii

Quadriceps Vastii also contract to resist the hyperextension of the leg and keeping the leg straight.

Gluteus Minimus:

Gluteus Minimus Heel Stretch

Gluteus Maximus and other extensors make sure, the flexors don’t overact and cause flexion of the standing leg so they also play a major role in keeping the leg straight.

Gluteus Medius:

Gluteus Medius

Gluteus Medius is a prime abductor as well as assists in flexion and extension of hip. 

Tensor Fascia Latae:

Tensor Fascia Latae

Tensor Fascia Latae is a flexor of the leg at hip joint so resists the extension of the hip over the limit.

All Muscles of the lower leg:

Heel Stretch

Lower leg muscles like dorsiflexors and plantarflexors make sure to stabilize the foot on the ground. 

Core’s Muscles Stabilizing

Spinal Extensors:

Spinal EHeel Stretchxtensor  Stretch

Spinal Extensors contract to resist the flexion of the spine and thus, keeping the spine straight.

Obliques Heel Stretch:

Heel Stretch

Obliques when acting on both sides flex the trunk. So, they resist the over extension of the spine and make sure that the spine is straight during the Heel Stretch.

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Transverse Abdominis:

Transverse Heel Stretch

The main function of Transverse Abdominis is to stabilize the spine and internal organs.

Rectus Abdominis Heel Stretch:

Heel Rectus Abdominals

Rectus Abdominis is the most powerful flexor of the trunk and it will also make sure that the spine doesn’t get hyperextended and maintains the posture.

Quadratus Lumborum Heel Stretch:

Stretch Lomburm

Quadratus Lumborum is another stabilizer of the spine as well as the pelvis.

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heel stretch lesson

C Jump Anatomy

C Jump Anatomy is a very elegant dance move that shows the body’s flexibility and the ability of the body to jump higher in a beautiful way. It’s called C Jump because on executing it, you make a ‘C’ with your body while in the air.

For executing a C Jump, you start by doing a down Channe (in plie) and keep your hips tucked in and your back straight. Hips and shoulders should be in one line. Both legs in a C jump go up towards the head. You should have your arms in 2nd position. Then look up and back as much as you can. Think about your quads sitting on table and reaching up and over with your legs. Land on one foot at a time, not both! Left foot, then right foot. Don’t aim your feet for the back of your head. Try to get your feet towards your mouth.

For the beginners, the correct knowledge about the muscles stretching and contracting is very important before they can try practicing this move because only by that they can find out which muscle is lacking flexibility or strength so that they can work on it. So, let’s start about learning the muscles.

Muscles Contracting to bring the body into straight airborne position

Plantarflexors:

C jump Anatomy

Before entering C position, the body should airborne and for this purpose, several muscles help the body in achieving it’s airborne status. Plantarflexors are one of them and they help in jumping with the help of the toes by plantarflexing the foot.

Hamstrings:

C jump Anatomy

Hamstrings are the extensors of the leg. They contract more if the jump is initiated with horizontal trunk. 

Quadriceps:

C jump Anatomy

Quadriceps are the flexors of the leg at hip joint. They contract more if the C jump anatomy is initiated with vertical trunk.

Gluteus Maximus:

C jump Anatomy

Gluteus Maximus is also an extensor of the leg and it also provides force to push the body straight upwards in airborne position.

Adductors:

C jump Anatomy

Adductors contract more if the jump is initiated from a wider foot position and provide the force to the jump.

Spinal Extensors:

C jump Anatomy

Spinal Extensors make sure to keep the spine straight while the body is in airborne position.

Muscles Lengthening while coming in and out of the C-Position

Rectus Femoris:

C jump Anatomy

Rectus Femoris is a flexor of the thigh but during the C Jump Position, the leg is hyperextended so Rectus Femoris is stretching.

Psoas Major:

C jump Anatomy

Psoas Major is a major flexor of the leg and just like Rectus Femoris, it is also lengthening due to hyperextension of the legs.

Iliacus:

C jump Anatomy

It is a muscle that works in collaboration with Psoas Major. It helps in the flexion of the leg but here it will be stretching.

Sartorius:

C jump Anatomy

Sartorius is also a flexor of the hip joint and like others, it is stretching too.

Tensor Fascia Latae:

C jump Anatomy

Tensor Fascia Latae is a gluteal muscle that will also contract to flex the leg thus, lengthening here.

Pectineus and Adductors:

C jump Anatomy

Pectineus and other adductors apart from causing adduction of the legs, also contract to produce flexion in the leg at the hip joint, so they are also lengthening.

Quadriceps Vasti:

Quadriceps C jump

Quadriceps Vasti are flexors of the hip and extensors of the knee. Both of these movements are against what we trying to achieve in C Jump therefore, they are stretching.

Dorsiflexors:

C jump Anatomy

As the feet are in plantarflexed position, the dorsiflexors are definitely lengthening.

Muscles Contracting while coming in and out of the C-Position

Gluteus Maximus:

Gluteus Maximus

Gluteus Maximus is a extensor of the hip joint and a perfect muscle to be contracting during the execution of C Jump.

Hamstrings:

C jump Anatomy

For achieving that hyperextension, you need leg extensors to contract and thats why Hamstrings must be contracting strongly during the C Jump.

Plantarflexors:

C jump Anatomy

The feet have to be in plantarflexed position so that they can be more closer to the upper limbs so the Plantarflexors are contracting.

Muscles Contracting while Lengthening

Rectus Abdominis:

C jump Anatomy

Rectus Abdominis is a major flexor of the trunk that will be resisting the hyperextension of the spine and maintains the position.

Obliques:

C jump Anatomy

Obliques also flex the core on contracting bilaterally. Here they will be limiting the hyperextension of the spine and thus, maintain the position.

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Psoas Minor C jump Anatomy:

Psoas Minor

Psoas Minor is a flexor of the core and it will be contracting while lengthening during the C Jump to maintain the C jump anatomy position.

Psoas Major C jump Anatomy:

Psoas Major

Psoas Major also participates in maintaining position in addition to Psoas Minor by resisting hyperextension.

Cervical Flexors C jump Anatomy:

Cerical Flexors

Cervical Flexors flex the neck anteriorly but here they are contracting while lengthening to maintain the position.

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Full Locust

Yogini Pole Dance Anatomy

Yogini Pole Dance move also know as basket, boat or Houdini. Yogini Pole move is one of the most beautiful moves because it makes you look like you are flying effortlessly. It is an intermediate level move that requires strength, flexibility and super good grip. It uses the grip of one arm to hold the weight of the whole body. Open shoulders are needed for this move to execute properly.

To do this move, you need to strengthen your core and practise it repeatedly for perfection. Flexibility is really important but in addition to that you need to contract your chest and shoulder blades for easier execution.

To do this move, you need to strengthen your core and practise it repeatedly for perfection. Flexibility is really important but in addition to that you need to contract your chest and shoulder blades for easier execution. 

This is how you do Yogini Pole Dance move: First of all, grip the pole with your armpit in front. Then, arch your leg on the same side and hold your ankle. Use your other hand to hold the pole to maintain balance. Arch your other leg and grab the ankle with other hand. Now, strengthen both arms. Maintain distance between your hips and knees. Push your hip bone towards the pole for support and add strength to the arm that squeezes the pole. At last, arch your back and chest up and shoulders back to correct your posture.

Doing this with having proper knowledge about the muscles can be injurious. So, this article will provide all the important information about how different muscles work during this elegant move. 

Muscles Lengthening

Quadriceps:

Yogini Pole Dance

Quadriceps are major flexors of the thigh and as you can see the thighs are actually hyperextended during the Yogini Pole Dance move. This is why, Quadriceps are getting lengthened here.

Tensor Fascia Latae:

Yogini Pole Dance

Tensor Fascia Latae is a gluteal muscle that acts as a flexor of the hip, thus just like Quadriceps, it also gets stretched.

Psoas Major:

Yogini Pole Dance

It is also a major flexor of the leg at hip joint that will be lengthening here due to extension of the leg.

Iliacus:

Yogini Pole Dance

This particular muscle works with the Psoas muscles to produce flexion in the thigh at hip joint (also lengthening during this move). 

Sartorius:

Yogini Pole Dance

It is a unique muscle because it helps in flexion of both hip and knee joint.

Pectineus:

Yogini Pole Dance

In addition to being an adductor, it also acts as a flexor of the thigh thus, gets stretched during the Yogini Pole Dance.

Adductor Magnus:

Yogini Pole Dance

The legs are separated or abducted during Yogini Pole Dance Move hence the prime adductor, Adductor Magnus, is being stretched.

Adductor Longus:

Yogini Pole Dance

Like Adductor Magnus, Adductor Magnus will also be stretched whole executing this move.

Adductor Brevis:

Yogini Pole Dance

Another adductor of the leg, lengthening.

Gracilis:

Yogini Pole Dance

It is a strap like long muscle that produces powerful adduction. In this case, it is getting stretched.

Rectus Abdominis:

Yogini Pole Dance

Rectus Abdominis is a flexor of the trunk but here as you can see, the trunk is hyperextended and so, the Rectus Abdominis is getting stretched.

Obliques:

Yogini Pole Dance

Obliques also provide flexion of the trunk and thus, are getting stretched.

Psoas Minor:

Yogini Pole Dance

Psoas Minor is also a flexor of lumbar spine. Therefore, it is lengthening here.

Dorsiflexors:

Yogini Pole Dance

The feet can be seen in plantarflexed position so, it is obvious that the dorsiflexors are lengthening during the Yogini Pole Dance move.

Biceps:

Yogini Pole Dance

The forearms are extended so Biceps are being stretched that act as forearm flexors.

Pectoralis Major:

Yogini Pole Dance

Pectoralis Major acts as adductor and depressor of the arm as well as rotates the arm forwards. Arms can be seen abducted here. So, Pectoralis Major is stretching.

Serratus Anterior:

Yogini Pole Dance

Serratus Anterior is also known as ‘the Boxer’s Muscle’. It assists in protraction of scapula but the opposite is happening here so, it is being lengthened.

Trapizeus:

Yogini Pole Dance

Trapizeus is responsible for Rotation, retraction, elevation, and depression of scapula. It is also being lengthened during Yogini Pole Dance move.

Muscles Contracting

Subscapularis:

Yogini Pole Dance

It is a rotator cuff muscle and acts as an internal rotator and stabilizer of the shoulder joint. As internal rotation is happening, it is contracting during this move.

Posterior Deltoids:

Posterior Deltoids

Posterior Deltoid extends the arm and also causes horizontal abduction. It is also contracting.

Rhomboids:

Rhomboids

These are the retractors, elevators and rotators of the scapula, especially assisting during Yogini Pole Dance.

Levator Scapulae:

Levator Sapulae

Levator Scapulae works as an elevator of the scapula. Elevation of scapula is important during the Yogini Pole Move so it is contracting.

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Triceps:

Triceps

Triceps are the extensors of the forearm and as it can be seen, the forearm is extended at elbow joint, hence the Triceps are contracting.

Hamstrings:

Hamstrings

Hamstrings are extensors of the leg at hip joint. So, there contraction is really important for this move.

Glutes:

Glutes

Glutes except Tensor Fascia Latae are also extensors of the hip joint.

Finger Flexors:

Finger Flexors

Fingers Flexors will be contracting here with great strength to provide strong grip.

Muscles exerting extra tension on the pole side

Teres Major:

Teres Major

Teres Major of pole side adducts the arm and also internally rotates it. Adduction provides extra friction between body and the pole and helps to hold to the position.

Rhomboids Yogini Pole Dance:

Romboids

Rhomboids help in retracting the scapula and also in elevating it. They will also provide tension on the pole side.

Adductor Magnus Yogini Pole Dance:

Contracting

Adductor Magnus are adductors of the leg but in this case the one on the pole side will contract and with the leg, brings the arm closer to the pole to provide extra tension.

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Full Locust

Half Moon Yoga Anatomy

Half Moon Yoga Pose is also known as “Ardha Chandrasana”. It is a very difficult to execute pose specially for beginners that tests your balance. In this pose, you root down your standing leg and stabilize your one arm while lifting and extending your raised leg and opposite arm.

Half Moon Yoga challenges your leg muscles. It is similar to “Utthita Trikonasana” in full-body extension. Half Moon Pose is recommended on both sides to work on postural imbalance.

By practicing it regularly, one can lengthen their ribcage (In case of  tight chest) and also make it more easy for their torso to rotate. It has many other benefits as well. Practicing it strengthens your thighs, ankles, abdomen and buttocks. It opens the chest, shoulders and torso as well as lengthening the spine. Half Moon Pose also effectively stretches groin, hamstrings and calves. 

It is important to know the major muscles groups acting during an exercise. In case of Half Moon Yoga, these are the muscles that act to make this pose possible to execute. 

Standing Leg Muscles Lengthening

Hamstrings:

half moon yoga

Hamstrings primarily act as hip extensors and knee flexors but while executing Half Moon Pose, the more medial Hamstrings lengthen as abduction occurs.

Adductor Magnus (Ischial Fibers):

half moon yoga

The Adductor Magnus not only causes the adduction of the thighs but it’s ischial fibers also cause extension of the hip joint. Hence, it gets lengthened. 

Gracilis Half Moon Yoga:

half moon yoga

Gracilis is another adductor of the thigh and flexor of the knee that will be lengthened during Half Moon Yoga.

Lifted Leg Muscles Lengthening

Adductor Magnus:

half moon yoga

Adductor Magnus of the lifted leg also gets lengthened as the leg gets abducted more and more.

Adductor Longus:

half moon yoga

Adductor Longus is another adductor of the leg at hip joint that will be lengthened as a result.

Adductor Brevis:

half moon yoga

This small adductor of the leg also gets stretched during the pose. 

Gracilis:

gracilius

As discussed before, Gracilis of the lifted leg also limits the abduction so it’s lengthening is essential.

Pectineus:

pectineus

Another adductor that gets stretched during the pose.

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Lifted Leg Muscles Contracting

Gluteus Medius Half Moon Yoga:

half moon yoga

It is the prime abductor of the leg and in the lifted leg, it helps to lift off the leg away from the supporting leg.

Gluteus Minimus:

half moon yoga

Gluteus Minimus also acts as an abductor, so it will be contracted to assist the abduction of the lifted leg.

Gluteus Maximus (upper fibers):

lifted leg yoga

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half moon yoga

Knee Strike Anatomy

Knee Strike Anatomy is simply a strike with your knee. It is a very dangerous move as it can severely injure the person receiving it, due to this, it is not allowed in many combat sports. Knee Strike is allowed in styles like Muay Thai and it is a predominant part of it. Knee strikes are native to the traditional Southeast Asian martial arts and traditional Okinawan martial arts.

Knee Strike utilizes one of the body’s natural weapon, the kneecap, transforming the leg into an incredibly powerful battering ram. Particularly effective when used against a soft tissue target, a knee strike is also a very effective exercise. It uses both lower and lateral abdominals, glutes and front hip flexors and combines it all with the physics involved around the whiplash motion of the upper body, pivoting over the hip joint to help increase the power the move delivers. If you just spend an hour perfecting this move you will walk away with a perfectly good workout.

Let’s discuss the muscles involved in executing a Knee Strike in detail.

Supporting Leg’s Muscles needed to be flexible

Adductors:

Adductors of the supporting leg are major restrictors of movements like Knee Strike hence they need to be flexible.

Hip Flexors:

Hip Flexors of the supporting leg need to be flexible because the supporting leg always remains extended and provides all the support to rest of the body. 

Kicking Leg’s Muscles needed to be flexible

Adductor Magnus (ischial fibers): 

Ischial Part of Adductor Magnus acts like hamstrings in extending the hip so it should be flexible enough to allow free flexion of the thigh for Knee Strike.

Adductor Longus:

It is a strong adductor of the leg that can restrict the movement as shown in the figure hence needs to be flexible.

Gluteus Maximus:

Gluteus Maximus mainly of the lifted leg cause resistance to the flexing movement of the thigh as it is an extensor so it’s flexibility is important.

Gluteus Medius (posterior fibers):

Just as Gluteus Maximus, the posterior fibers of Gluteus Medius act as extensors of the thigh at the hip restricting the flexion of the thigh.

Piriformis:

Another Hip extensor that needs flexibility for perfect execution of Knee Strike.

Supporting Leg’s Muscles needed to be stronger

Calf Muscles:

Calf Muscles act as plantarflexors. Plantarflexion is important movement during Knee Strike as you can see in the figure because it increases the range of the attack and also gives power. 

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Adductors:

Adductors

Some of the Adductors act as hip extensors, like Ischial fibers of Adductor Magnus so they need to be strengthened in the supporting leg.

Hip knee strike

Hip Flexors:
Hip Flexors also require strength in the supporting leg for a nice, powerful Knee Strike.

Quadriceps:
Quadriceps act as hip extensors and knee flexors. They are also required to be stronger.

Kicking Leg’s Muscles needed to be stronger

Adductors Knee Strike Anatomy:

Muscle stronger

Adductors of the kicking leg in addition to having flexibility, should also have strength.

Hamstrings Knee Strike Anatomy:

Knee Strike Anatomy

Hamstrings help in the flexion of the knee so a very important muscle for the moves like Knee Strike where the knee needs to be flexed.

Hip Flexors Knee Strike Anatomy:

Knee Strike Anatomy

Hip Flexors are very important in Knee Strike because without them, the kicking leg can’t be lifted.

Core Muscles needed to be stronger

Knee Strike Anatomy

Abdominals: 

Abdominals need to be stronger in Knee Strike as they help in bending the trunk and supports the body against gravity.

Obliques:

Just like Abdominals, Obliques also help in flexion of the trunk so, needs to be stronger.

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Hip Flexors

ZejaX Piston Squat Anatomy

A Unilateral Piston Squat Anatomy is a squat in which the two feet aren’t alongside one another.

A Piston Squat Anatomy is a kind of Unilateral Squat in which the non-weight bearing foot is elevated in front of the body making sure it is as straight as possible horizontally. In ZejaX Piston Squat, the practitioner uses a rod and with it’s rear end, balances himself while doing the squat. This way, it is easier to do the Piston Squat. 

 Piston Squat is an effective way to tone the legs and glutes as well as strengthen the core muscles and increase flexibility. This exercise is an ideal exercise for athletes of all sports and skill levels but it is especially beneficial for runners.

This exercise targets the same muscles required for running. These muscles are hamstrings, glutes, quadriceps and calves. It’s also a really effective core workout because it demands so much in terms of posture and support.

It is a different move to execute for beginners as they are unaware of the muscles acting during this move so this article is all about the muscles involved in executing this exercise.

Supporting Leg’s Muscles

Quadriceps:

Quadriceps are the flexors of the hip joint. It is their contraction in the supporting leg that the body comes into the squatting position.

Gluteus Maximus:

Gluteus Maximus is an abductor, external rotator and extensor of the leg at the hip joint. It’s flexibility is important for a good Piston Squat.

Gluteus Medius (posterior fibers):

The Posterior fibers of Gluteus Medius act just like Gluteus Maximus and act as extensors, lateral rotators and abductors of the leg. Their flexibility is also important.

Adductor Magnus (ischial fibers):

The Ischial fibers of Adductor Magnus produce extension of the leg at hip joint hence it should have enough flexibility to let the body do Piston Squat.

Lower Leg muscle groups Piston Squat Anatomy:

The lower leg’s muscles act as stabilizers of the hip joint and help in balancing.

Lifted Leg’s Muscles Contracting

Quadriceps Piston Squat Anatomy:

Quadriceps are flexors of the thigh and extensors of the knee that will elevate the left leg on contraction.

Sartorius Piston Squat Anatomy:

Sartorius will contract to flex the leg at hip joint hence, it has an important role here and it’s strength is important.

Tensor Fascia Latae:

Tensor Fascia Latae is also causes abduction of the leg at the hip joint in addition to extension.

Pectineus:

Pectineus is a flexor and abductor of the leg at hip joint. It’s contraction is important in executing Piston Squat. 

Iliacus:

Iliacus is a flexor of the femur that works along with Psoas. Just like other flexors of the thigh, it’s strength is also important in execution of Piston Squat.

Psoas:

Psoas is another flexor that will contract in order to elevate the left leg.

Adductors of the leg:

Adductors of the leg also contract in this particular move so there should be strength in them too. 

Lifted Leg’s Muscles Lengthening

Hamstrings:

Hamstrings are extensors of the thigh that will be restricting the flexion of the leg. So, there will be lengthening of Hamstrings.

Adductor Magnus (ischial fibers):

Ischial fibers of Adductor Magnus are also stretched because of being the extensors of the thigh but the movement happening is flexion.

Gluteus Maximus:

Gluteus Maximus is also one of the extensors of the leg. Due to this, it will also be lengthening. 

Piriformis:

Piriformis acts as a hip extensor so it will be lengthening in the lifted leg during Piston Squat.

Gluteus Medius (posterior fibers):

The posterior fibers of Gluteus Medius act just like Gluteus Maximus and will be getting stretched during this move.

Front Arm’s Muscles

Biceps:

The Biceps of the front arm will be lengthening due to being the flexor of the forearm and the front arm needs to be extended.

Brachialis:

Brachialis is a flexor of the forearm just as Biceps so it is also being stretched during the Piston Squat in the front arm.

Brachioradialis:

Just as the other two flexors of the forearm, Brachioradialis is also being stretched in the front arm.

Flexors of the Fingers:

The flexors of the fingers contract to hold the rod tightly so that it doesn’t slip from the hands.

Pectoralis Major:

Pectoralis Major acts as a adductor and depressor of the arm as well as an internal rotator, hence it is also contracting during Piston Squat.

Subscapularis:

Subscapularis is also an internal rotator of the arm, as well as an adductor. So, just like Pectoralis Major, it will also contract during the execution of Piston Squat.

Teres Major:

Teres Major is an internal rotator and extensor of the arm from flexed position. It also assists the front arm during in holding the rod.

Back Arm’s Muscles

Anterior Deltoid:

Anterior Deltoid helps the arm to move forward by flexing it. It will be lengthening in the back arm as the arm is positioned in the back side.

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Pectoralis Major:

Pectoralis Major is contracting here also to produce internal rotation and adduction.

Triceps:

Triceps are the principal extensor of the forearm. It will be lengthening here as the arm is being flexed.

Flexors of the Fingers:

The flexors of the fingers contract in the back arm also just as they are flexing in the front arm so that the rod can be hold tightly.

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Piston Squat Anatomy