Pancake Spin Anatomy

(Pancake Spin Anatomy) Figure Skating, a sport where individuals perform some amazing manoeuvres and moves on figure skates. It’s is the first winter sport to be included in Olympic Games.

Spins are important element in Figure Skating. Pancake Spin is a type of ‘Sit Spin’ in which one leg is crossed over the other and the trunk is bent over it.

This incredible exhibition of balance and flexibility requires strength and flexibility in some important body muscles specially related to lower limb. This article will cover muscle anatomy behind Pancake Spin so you know which muscles to work on, for perfect execution of Pancake Spin.

Supporting Leg Muscles Lengthening while Contracting

Hamstrings:

Pancake Spin Anatomy

Hamstrings act to extend the leg at the hip joint. During the Pancake Spin, the supporting leg is flexed at the hip joint hence the Hamstrings are lengthening but to achieve that half sited position, the Hamstrings contract too.

Adductor Magnus (Ischial Fibers):

Pancake Spin Anatomy

The ischial fibers of Adductor Magnus act just like Hamstrings. These fibers also extend the leg at the hip joint and thus gets lengthened during Pancake Spin and during the lengthening, contracting to hold the position.

Gluteus Maximus:

Pancake Spin Anatomy

It is also an extensor of the hip. That is why just like the above two extensors, it also gets lengthened and contracted at the same time.

Gluteus Medius (Posterior Fibers):

Pancake Spin Anatomy

The posterior fibers of this muscle also follow the same trend of performing the same action and getting lengthened while being contracted.

Periformis:

Pancake Spin Anatomy

It is an external rotator and abductor of the leg and gets lengthened while contracting.

Soleus:

Pancake Spin Anatomy

Soleus is a strong plantarflexor of the foot. While executing the Pancake Spin, the whole body weight is on the supporting foot and it gets dorsiflexed a little and hence Soleus gets lengthened. But to limit the dorsiflexion, it has to contract.

Quadriceps Vasti:

Pancake Spin Anatomy

The Vasti muscles are responsible for the extension of the knee but in Pancake Spin, the knee has to bend but not much. This is why this muscle is stretching while being contracted.

Top Leg Muscles Lengthening while Contracting

Adductor Magnus (Ischial Fibers):

Just like the one in supporting leg, the ischial fibers of the top leg Adductor Magnus are getting lengthened while being contracted as the leg gets flexed.

Gluteus Maximus:

Gluteus Maximus

Here, Gluteus Maximus not only performing the extension of the hip joint and while doing so, getting lengthened in Pancake Spin, but it is also externally rotating the leg so is contracting.

Gluteus Medius:

Gluteus Medius

Extends the leg at hip joint against flexion. Gets lengthened in dling so. Contracts to hold the position.

Gluteus Minimus:

Just like Gluteus Medius, it also gets lengthened and contracted at the same time performing the same functions.

Piriformis:

Piriformis

As discussed above, it is an external rotator and abductor of the leg. It also gets stretched while being contracted.

Top Leg Muscles Lengthening

Quadriceps Vasti:

Vasti muscles that perform the extension of the knee are only being lengthened during this particular move in the top leg.

Read More: https://easyflexibilityblog.com/2021/12/30/pancake-spin-anatomy/

Muscles Stabilizing Supporting Leg

Gluteus Medius:

Gluteus Medius doesn’t allow the leg to get fully flexed at hip joint by extending it thus supports the leg.

Gluteus Minimus Pancake spin anatomy:

Gluteus Minimus also supports the supporting leg due to it being a hip stabilizer. Secondarily, it also performs hip extension and thus stabilizing it more against gravity.

Muscles Stabilizing Top Leg

Hamstrings Pancake spin anatomy:

Hamstrings act on the top leg to extend it against the flexed position, stabilizing the top leg in the process.

Sartorius:Pancake spin anatomy

It is both a hip and knee flexor that acts to stabilize the top leg too.

Press Handstand Anatomy

A Press Handstand Anatomy is a hybrid of a press and handstand hold. It is an exercise that targets some major body muscles for such as the muscles of the torso, hamstrings and the hip flexors.

A Press Handstand is practiced by gymnasts and acrobats.  It is performed mainly by getting into the handstand from sitting or standing straddle.

You may ask: “What are the benefits this type of handstand offers?” It is an advanced exercise in with all the stabilizer muscles of the torso participate hence it is helpful in building the core strength. Secondly, while performing a Press Handstand, you engage all of your body muscles from top to bottom (a complete body exercise). It also helps you improve the coordination between different muscle groups of the body thus gives you control over your body while performing such balancing moves.

This article will cover the muscles that stretch and contract while executing a Press Handstand. So, let’s start the muscle anatomy.

Muscles Lengthening

Hamstrings:

Press Handstand Anatomy

Hamstrings are one of the muscles on which the Press Handstand is most effective on. Hamstrings are the hip extensors and knee flexors. They stretch while doing the Press Handstand.

Adductor Magnus:

Press Handstand Anatomy

It is the prime adductor of the leg. While executing the Press Handstand, the legs remain in the abducted position. This will stretch the adductors like Adductor Magnus. It will be stretched more with the wider straddle.

Adductor Longus:

Press Handstand Anatomy

Adductor Longus just like Adductor Magnus will be stretched.

Adductor Brevis:

Press Handstand Anatomy

The more you will abduct the legs, the more this small adductor will be lengthened. Press Handstand works on the flexibility of all the adductor muscles.

Pectineus:

Press Handstand Anatomy

Pectineus is also one of the adductors of the leg. So, it’s obvious that it will get stretched too just like the other adductors.

Gracilis:

Press Handstand Anatomy

Gracilis is a strong adductor of the thigh and according to the trend, it will be lengthened.

Rhomboids:

Press Handstand Anatomy

Rhomboids act on the scapula to retract it. In Press Handstand, the scapula protracts to come in a proper position of balancing hence Rhomboids stretch here.

Latissimus Dorsi:

Latissimus Dorsi

Lats help in scapular retraction and extension of the arm at shoulder joint. Press Handstand doesn’t require extension of the arm but the opposite so the Lats stretch during performing Press Handstand.

Teres Major:

Teres Major

Just like Latissimus Dorsi, this muscle also assists in extending the arm at shoulder joint. And gets stretched when you perform a Press Handstand.

Muscles Lengthening while Contracting

Wrist Flexors:

Wrist Flexors

In a Press Handstand, the wrist is in extended position so that the palm of the hand faces the ground and the wrist flexors are pretty much stretched. But they contract to make that the wrist locks without getting extending further that can lead to injury.

Muscles Contracting

Psoas:

Psoas is a flexor of the leg at the hip joint. To execute the perfect Press Handstand, you need to flex the legs at the hip joint. This muscle along with other hip flexors will help you to achieve the same fate.

Iliacus:

Iliacus always works with Psoas muscles to flex the hip. Thus, it contracts during Press Handstand.

Quadriceps:

Quadriceps flex the thigh at hip joint and extends the leg at knee joint. Both movements perfect for a Press Handstand.

Tensor Fascia Lata:

Tensor Fascia Lata acts on the leg to abduct it and also flex it at hip joint. Without abduction, you can’t reach the straddle position important for Press Handstand. Thus, its contraction is important.

Gluteus Medius (Anterior Fibers):

Anterior Fibers of Gluteus Medius flex the thigh at hip joint. So, its contraction is understandable in Press Handstand.

Gluteus Maximus (Upper Fibers):

The upper fibers of Gluteus Maximus are exclusive for abduction of the legs. You will be required to contract it for achieving the straddle position.

Pronator Teres:

The arms transmit the weight of the body to hands and it is most efficient during pronated state of the arms that you can see in the picture. This is why the contraction of Pronator Teres is important.

Pronator Quadratus:


Pronator Quadratus will also help in pronation of the arm.

Anterior Deltoid:

Anterior Deltoid will make sure to flex the arm at the shoulder joint and shift the body weight above the arm and stabilize the arm during Press Handstand. Its contraction is very important to execute this move.

Pectoralis Major (Clavicular part):

Pectoralis Major’s clavicular flexes the arm just like anterior Deltoid. So, assists in maintaining the elevated position of the arm.

Triceps:

Press Handstand Anatomy

Triceps extends the elbow. During Press Handstand, it will prevent the flexion of the arm at the elbow joint and help in carrying all the weight of the body.

Serratus Anterior Press Handstand Anatomy:

Press Handstand Anatomy

Serratus Anterior performs very important s during Press Handstand and that are scapular protraction and upward rotation scapulohumeral joint.

Quadratus Lumborum Press Handstand Anatomy:

Quadratus Lumborum is a lateral flexor of the spine but working bilaterally, it depresses the thoracic cage. And, that helps in forceful expiration. It is also a lumbar spine stabilize. So, it is a multifunctional muscle and its contraction is helpful during Press Handstand.

Spinal Extensors Press Handstand Anatomy:

Spinal Extensors help to extend the spine to achieve a straight spine during the Press Handstand. Thus, they are contracting.

Read more: https://easyflexibilityblog.com/2021/10/25/side-splits-anatomy/

Click on the picture below to get your Handstand Mastery Program:

EasyFlexibility

Eka Pada Sirsasana Muscle Anatomy

Eka Pada Sirsasana or Sirshasana means ‘Foot behind the head’. This pose is done by sitting upright with legs extended in front and then grabbing the ankle of one foot and tucking it back of the head. After that releasing the grip and bring together the hands at the centre of the chest.

This is considered an advanced pose requiring the flexibility of the hip extensors. Traditionally, it is known for its benefits like lowering the anxiety and massaging the internal organs.

Apart from yoga, it is being used in other sports and activities too. For example, Jiu-Jitsu practitioners use this pose when looking for different types of chokes, Break dancers, Pole dancers and other kicking martial arts stylists can improve their skills widely if Eka Pada is well developed.

Without further ado, let’s start the Anatomy behind Eka Pada.

Muscles Lengthening in the High Leg

Hamstrings:

Eka Pada Sirsasana

Hamstrings are the prime extensors of the hip joint. During Eka Pada Sirsasana, the leg that is behind the head is hyper flexed, thus Hamstrings are being lengthened more than they normally do.

Gluteus Maximus:

Eka Pada Sirsasana

Its function is also to extend the leg at the hip joint. During hip flexion, it will also be stretched.

Piriformis:

Eka Pada Sirsasana

Piriformis also acts as an extensor of the hip joint in addition to being an abductor and external rotator of the leg.

Obturator Internus:

Eka Pada Sirsasana

Obturator Internus externally rotates the extended thigh and abducts the flexed leg. It also gets stretched during the pose.

Superior Gemellus:

Eka Pada Sirsasana

It is also an external rotator of the leg and one of the three parts of Triceps Coxae. It gets stretched while executing Eka Pada Sirsasana.

Inferior Gemellus:

Eka Pada Sirsasana

Another part of Triceps Coxae and another external rotator of the thigh that is getting stretched during executing this pose.

Gluteus Medius:

Eka Pada Sirsasana

This muscle of the gluteal region helps in thigh extension, abduction and medial rotation of the leg. Just like Gluteus Maximus, it gets lengthened during the execution of Eka Pada Sirsasana.

Adductor Magnus (Ischial Fibers):

Hamstrings

The Ischial Part of Adductor Magnus acts as an extensor of the thigh hence getting stretched.

Muscles Lengthening in the Lower Leg

Hamstrings:

The lower leg is also positioned in a flexed position that is why Hamstrings that are extensors of the thigh gets stretched.

Gastrocnemius Eka Pada Sirsasana :

Gastrocnemius

It acts on the foot to plantarflex it at the ankle joint and on the knee to flex it. But as you can see in the picture, the knee is extended so it gets lengthened.

Read More: https://easyflexibilityblog.com/2022/01/24/developpe-a-la-seconde-muscle-anatomy/

Adductor Magnus (Ischial Fibers):

The Ischial Fibers extends the thigh at the hip joint that is why it gets lengthened during the process of hip flexion as occurs during executing Eka Pada Sirsasana.

Piriformis:

Piriformis

The Piriformis muscle rotates the femur during the hip extension and abducts the femur during flexion of the hip.

Gluteus Maximus Eka Pada Sirsasana :

Gluteus Maximus

Gluteus Maximus is also an extensor of the hip that will be stretched here.

Want to learn more about Easyflexibility Eka Pada Sirsasana Program? Click on the picture below:

EasyFlexibility

Garudasana/Eagle Pose Anatomy

(Garudasana/Eagle Pose) In Sanskrit, the word ‘Garuda’ means Eagle and ‘Sana’ means pose. That’s why the other name for ‘Garudasana’ is Eagle Pose.

Eagle pose is done by crossing one leg over the other while crossing the opposite side arm over the other arm and joining the palms together. As during the execution of Eagle Pose, the performer is standing on one leg, this exercise helps you build your balance and focus. It also improves your body awareness and your core strength.

It is very unique exercise as it allows to stretch very commonly untouched muscle groups like the external rotators of the hip and muscles of the back and shoulders etc. It has other wide range of benefits too apart from improving the flexibility and body strength of some muscles. It is known for relieving asthma and lower back pain. Also, it is known to bring blood and energy flow to reproductive organs.

Eagle Pose can be really difficult for some people as it involves crossing the arms twice at the elbows and finally joining the palms together stressing the wrist joint too. Thus, it is important to know which muscles assist during its execution and which muscles stretch.

So, let’s start the anatomy behind the Eagle Pose.

Muscles Lengthening

Trapezius:

Garudasana/Eagle Pose

Trapezius is a trapezoid shaped muscle on the back helps to retract, rotate and depress scapula. Here, its lower part is lengthening as the scapula is in protracted state.

Rhomboids:

Garudasana/Eagle Pose

Rhomboids act to bring the shoulder blades together but during Eagle Pose, they get stretched.

Middle Deltoid (Posterior Fibers):

Garudasana/Eagle Pose

Middle Deltoid is am abductor of the arm. In Eagle Pose, the arms are positioned in an adducted state hence the Middle Deltoid gets stretched.

Posterior Deltoid:

Garudasana/Eagle Pose

The extension of the arm is assisted through this muscle. During the Eagle Pose, the arms are flexed forward and that’s why this muscle is stretched.

Teres Minor:

Garudasana/Eagle Pose

Teres Minor gets lengthened during the flexion of the arm. The main function of this muscle is actually external rotation of the humerus.

Infraspinatus:

Garudasana/Eagle Pose

It is a part of rotator cuff muscles. It helps in extension of the arm at shoulder joint and gets stretched during the Eagle Pose.

Deep six Lateral Rotators:

Garudasana/Eagle Pose

During the Eagle Pose, one leg crosses the other leg and for that internal rotation is the key. Deep six Lateral Rotators are lengthened during the process.

Gluteus Maximus:

Gluteus Maximus

Gluteus Maximus is an extensor and external rotator of the leg. Both legs are placed in a semi flexed position during the Eagle Pose that is why it gets lengthened.

Gluteus Medius (Posterior Fibers):

Just like Gluteus Maximus, the posterior fibers of Gluteus Medius also get stretched due to them being the extensors of the leg.

Muscles Contracting

Pectoralis Minor:

Pectoralis Minor

This muscle protracts scapula and also stabilizes and plays a major role during the formation of Eagle Arm.

Pectoralis Major:

Pectorials Major

Pectoralis Major assists in arm adduction and internal rotation. Both these movements are involved in the Eagle Pose.

Serratus Anterior:

Serratus Anterior

Serratus Anterior protracts the scapula and contracts during the Eagle Pose execution.

Coracobrachialis:

This muscle is an adductor and flexor of the arm. Without these movements, it is not possible to implement the Eagle Pose.

Infraspinatus:

As a lateral rotator of the arm and stabilizer of shoulder joint, it contracts and helps to achieve the Eagle Pose.

Teres Minor:

Just like Infraspinatus, it is lengthening as well as contracting. As a lateral rotator of the arm and part of rotator cuff muscles, it contracts.

Posterior Deltoid:

Posterior Deltoid is another muscle that has dual functions and gets stretched as well as contracts to assist the lateral rotation of the arm.

Pronator Teres:

The arms should be in pronated state and to achieve this fate, Pronator Teres helps.

Pronator Quadratus:

Another pronator of the arm, helps to maintain the pronated position for the arms during the Eagle Pose.

Tensor Fascia Lata Garudasana/Eagle Pose:

It is a flexor, internal rotator and abductor of the leg. As mentioned before, the leg has to flex a little at the hip joint, here it helps. Also, the internal rotation is important movement for executing the Eagle Pose.

Read More: https://easyflexibilityblog.com/2021/12/30/pancake-spin-anatomy/

Adductor Magnus (Ischial Fibers):

The Ischial fibers of Adductor Magnus act as the internal rotator of the leg and hence is contracting here.

Gluteus Medius Garudasana/Eagle Pose:

 Garudasana/Eagle Pose

The anterior part assists in flexion of the thigh and also in internal rotation.

Gluteus Minimus Garudasana/Eagle Pose:

Have the same function as Gluteus Medius, in flexing the thigh and internal rotation of the leg. Thus, contracting during the Eagle Pose.

Want to learn more about Easyflexibility Garudasana/ Eagle Pose Program? Click on the picture below:

EasyFlexibility

Grand Plié Anatomy

(Grand Plié Anatomy) Plié is a French word and it means ‘to bend’. It is one of the graceful moves in Ballet dance. There are two types of Plié:

  1. Grand Plié: Involves bending the knees fully until the thighs are parallel to the ground and heels are lifted off the ground.
  2. Demi Plié: The knees are half bent and heels don’t rise off the ground.

Grand Plié is a Ballet technique of lowering and raising the centre of gravity using the legs. It starts from the first position. A perfect Grand Plié is smooth and free from jerks and the knees are bent halfway before raising the heels.

For a smooth Grand Plié, you need to condition some muscles groups that we are going to see below. Without working on these muscles, you are more prone to injury during executing the Grand Plié and it will not look as smooth as it should be.

So, let’s start with the anatomy behind Grand Plié.

Muscles Lengthening while Contracting

Quadriceps:

Grand Plié Anatomy

Quadriceps are extensors of the leg at knee joint and flexors of the thigh at hip joint. During Grand Plié, on the one hand it is assisting by flexing the thigh towards more horizontal position but on the other hand resisting the bending of the knee hence it is lengthening while contracting.

Soleus:

Grand Plié Anatomy

Soleus is a plantar flexor of the foot. While executing the Grand Plié, the heel has to be lifted up, so the foot is positioned in such way that plantarflexion is important to maintain balance. At the same time, the Soleus is getting lengthened to heel lift.

Gastrocnemius:

Grand Plié Anatomy

Just like Soleus, Gastrocnemius too helps in Plantarflexion and ultimately in balancing but also being stretched. It is partially neglected by knee flexion.

Fibularis Longus:

Grand Plié Anatomy

Fibularis Longus also assists during plantarflexion and is also being stretched and contracted at the same time.

Fibularis Brevis:

Grand Plié Anatomy

It also helps in plantarflexion and maintaining the balance.

Flexor Hallucis Longus:

Grand Plié Anatomy

During Grand Plié, this muscles contracts the great toe against the resistance which means it was stretched but is contracted to provide the required balance and grip from the ground.

Flexor Digitorum Longus:

Grand Plié Anatomy

Just like the flexor of the great toe, this muscles acts on the remaining toes and helps in providing the extra friction between the foot and the ground.

Tibialis Posterior:

Tibialis Posterior

It action is also plantar flexion of the foot and that’s why it is also in the category of muscles that are lengthening while contracting.

Abductor Digiti Minimi:

Abductor Digiti Minimi

Abductor Digiti Minimi has two main function during Grand Plié. First, it abducts the fifth toe. Secondly, it flexes it against the resistance. Both these movements help in increasing the surface area and provide balance during its execution.

Plantaris:

It is a weak plantarflexor and also a flexor of the knee. It also gets neglected during knee flexion.

Abductor Hallucis:

Abductor Hallucis

In addition to great toe’s flexion, it also abducts it increasing the surface area and is helpful during balancing.

Quadratus Plantae:

Flexor Accessorius

It acts as an assistant for another muscle. It assists Flexor Digitorum Longus in flexing lateral 4 toes against the resistance and in doing so, it is being contracted from the stretched position.

Gluteus Maximus:

Gluteus Maximus will externally rotate the leg to reach that first position of Ballet dance and also help to abduct the thighs during Grand Plié. It sharts in shortened position and never achieve full length.

Adductor Magnus (Ischial Part):

Ischial Part of Adductor Magnus will also help in slight lateral rotation of the leg.

Muscles Holding Contracted Position

Deep six Lateral Rotators:

Abduction is required mainly during executing the Grand Plié so it is obvious that Deep Six Lateral Rotators will take part in that and hold the contracted position.

Biceps Femoris:

Its main function is flexion of the knee and it will remain flexed to hold this flexed position. In addition, in semi flexed position of the knee, it will act as a lateral rotator of the lower leg on the knee joint.

Read More: https://easyflexibilityblog.com/2021/12/30/pancake-spin-anatomy/

Spinal Extensors Grand Plié Anatomy:

Spinal Extensors will act to extend the spine to maintain erect posture during Grand Plié and will be hold the contracted position.

Rectus Abdominis Grand Plié Anatomy:

Rectus Abdominis that is a flexor of the trunk will act to prevent anterior tilt of the pelvis.

Psoas Minor Grand Plié Anatomy:

Psoas Minor is a weak trunk flexor and also acts to prevent anterior tilt of the pelvis.

Muscles Lengthening

All Adductors and Pectineus:

All the Adductors and also Pectineus will be getting stretched here due to them causing the leg adduction and in Grand Plié, you have to abduct the legs.

Want to improve all your Dance & Ballet Techniques? Click on the picture below to get started:

EasyFlexibility

Ballet Turn Out Anatomy

Ballet Turn Out Anatomy: Ballet dance is a classic Italian dance that is known for it’s grace, precise steps and gestures. The steps are formalized in such intricate manner that it creates an illusion of an expression that is magnificent to look at.

Ballet dance have 5 basic positions. Here, we are going to talk about the first position and that is Ballet Turn Out. It is an important part of classic Ballet dance. Turn out is actually the angle between the central lines of the feet. A turn out of 180° is very difficult to active with training some muscles groups that we are going to see below.

Besides Ballet dancers, other athletes and performers like martial artists, figure skaters, football players and gymnasts also reply on hip turn out for beautiful as well as powerful techniques.

For a perfect Ballet Turn Out, it is important to have flexibility in internal rotators of the leg and strength in external rotators. Let’s see what are those internal and external rotators and other muscles that are involved in Ballet Turn Out.

Muscles Lengthening

Gluteus Medius (Anterior and Middle fibers):

Ballet Turn Out Anatomy

The Anterior and Middle fibers of Gluteus Medius causes internal rotation of the leg but in Ballet Turn Out, external rotation is done and that’s why these fibers are stretched during turn out.

Gluteus Minimus:

Ballet Turn Out Anatomy

It is also an internal rotator so, it will be stretched to achieve the turn out.

Tensor Fascia Lata:

Ballet Turn Out Anatomy

Tensor Fascia Lata, along with an abductor of the leg, is also a medial/internal rotator of the leg and that is why it will be lengthened.

Adductor Magnus:

Ballet Turn Out Anatomy

Adductor Magnus is a prime adductor of the leg. In addition to this, it also medially rotate the leg and this is against what we are trying to achieve in Ballet Turn Out. Hence, it will be stretched.

Adductor Longus:

Ballet Turn Out Anatomy

Adductor Longus is also a medial rotator of the leg, and also gets stretched by Ballet Turn Out.

Adductor Brevis:

Ballet Turn Out Anatomy

Just like other adductors, it is also a medial rotator of the leg and it is being lengthened to execute the turn out perfectly.

Pectineus:

Ballet Turn Out Anatomy

Another internal rotator that will be stretched to avoid getting in the way of external rotation during Ballet Turn Out.

Gracilis:

Ballet Turn Out Anatomy

This strap like muscle also helps in internal rotation along with adduction of the legs.

Semitendinosus:

Misc;es ;enghthening

Despite of being an internal rotator of the leg, it will not be lengthened because it will contract during hip extension that is also important in Ballet Turn Out.

Semimembranosus:

Semimembranosus

Semimembranosus is also a hip extensor and internal rotator, that will be contacted and will not resist external rotation of the leg.

Muscles Contracting

Gluteus Maximus:

Gluteus Maximus

Gluteus Maximus is the lateral rotator of the leg. Its contraction will be crucial in achieving that turned out position.

Deep six Lateral Rotators:

Deep Six Lateral Rotators

All these muscles will be of prime importance while executing Ballet Turn Out as their contraction cause lateral rotation of the leg.

Sartorius:

It has assisting role in lateral rotation of the leg at the hip joint. Hence, is contracting.

Rectus Femoris:

It also assists during Ballet Turn Out by extending the knee. Knee extension is required to make the legs in line with the body.

Biceps Femoris:

Biceps Femoris laterally rotates the leg at knee joint. This is why it will be contracting in particular.

Read More: https://easyflexibilityblog.com/2022/01/27/front-rack-position-anatomy/

Gluteus Medius (Posterior Fibers):

Unlike the Anterior and Middle fibers of the Gluteus Medius, the Posterior Fibers are external rotators of the hip. So, are contracting during the turn out.

Muscles causing Postural Tension

Quadriceps Vasti Ballet Turn Out Anatomy:

The Vasti muscles support the posture during Ballet Turn Out by extending the leg at knee joint.

Spinal Extensors Ballet Turn Out Anatomy:

Spinal Extensors help in achieving the erect posture of the spine during Ballet Turn Out. Their strength is also very important.

Transversus Abdominis Ballet Turn Out Anatomy:

Transversus Abdominis helps in stabilizing the lumbar spine and pelvic during Ballet Turn Out.

Get your Ballet Turn out Program Now! Click on the picture below to Get Started!

EasyFlexibility

ONE LEG SQUAT ANATOMY (Muscle and Motion)

One Leg Squat Anatomy is also called as Piston Squat among the body weight training enthusiasts. Another name given to it is Sit Spin.

It is done by standing on one leg while the knee bent slightly, and raising the other leg off the ground, extending it. The arms are also extended anteriorly (to maintain the balance). After that, you slowly lower yourself towards the ground by bending the standing leg. The other leg should always be off the ground.

It is often believed that if one can do a One Leg Squat anatomy, he has strong legs. Yes, leg strength is a major factor but for most athletes it’s the lack of flexibility and awareness that leads to the false technique. This is proved by the fact that many people who can squat and deadlift their own bodyweight cannot do a One leg squat anatomy.

Flexibility is required in three major areas of the body for a proper Piston Squat.

• Flexibility in the ankle of the standing leg.

• Flexibility in the hip of the standing leg.

• Posterior chain flexibility of the lifted leg.

Many muscles require strength as well. So, let’s start learning about the muscles involved in One Leg Squat that are contracting and others that are stretching.

Lower Leg Muscles Contracting

Quadriceps:

Quadriceps

Quadriceps flex the hip and on the other hand extends the knee. They are especially important when you go to the squat position. Here, they will contract and their strength will be important.

Gluteus Maximus:

ONE LEG SQUAT ANATOMY

Gluteus Maximus extends the thigh helping to hold the squat position against the gravity so its strength is very important to achieve the desired fate.

Gluteus Medius:

ONE LEG SQUAT ANATOMY

The anterior portion of Gluteus Medius flexes the hip but the posterior portion does the opposite and extends it. It will also help to hold the lower squat position.

Gluteus Minimus:

ONE LEG SQUAT ANATOMY

This Gluteal muscle also helps to hold the position by doing the same job as the other two Gluteal Muscles.

Adductor Magnus (Ischial Part):

ONE LEG SQUAT ANATOMY

The ischial or hamstring part of Adductor Magnus participates in extension of the hip. This way, it also helps resisting the pull of gravity while in squat position.

Tibialis Anterior:

ONE LEG SQUAT ANATOMY

It is a dorsiflexor of the foot works to maintain the balance in the standing leg. Without its contraction, you may fall on your back while trying to attempt One Leg Squat.

Lifted Leg Muscles Contracting

Rectus Femoris and Vastus:

Rectus Femoris and Vastus

The Quadriceps muscles are contracting here so that the thigh of the lifted leg remains flexed and the knee remains extended as required in Piston Squat.

Psoas:

ONE LEG SQUAT ANATOMY

Psoas muscles also act as hip flexors. They contract during the One Leg Squat so that the leg comes anteriorly by flexing it at the hip joint.

Iliacus:

Iliacus

Iliacus works along with the Psoas Muscles to flex the leg at the hip joint. Hence, working to lift the leg up and holding it at the lifted position.

Tensor Fascia Lata:

Tensor Fascia Lata

It is another flexor of the hip joint and will act to hold the leg above the ground.

Adductor Magnus (Pubic part):

Adductor Magnus

The upper or pubic part of Adductor Magnus acts as hip flexor. It will require strength as it is contracting here.

Adductor Longus:

Adductor Longus

Adductor Longus is an adductor of the thigh. In addition to this, it also participates in flexion of the thigh that is important here for maintaining the flexed position of lifted leg in Piston Squat.

Adductor Brevis:

Adductor Brevis

Adductor Brevis also plays a role in flexion of the hip hence is contracting here.

Gracilis:

Gracilis

Gracilis does a ton of actions. First, it’s an adductor of the thighs. It also helps in flexion of the hip as well as flexion of the knee. The action of flexion of thigh is especially important here and for that its strength is important.

Sartorius:

Sartorius is also a hip and knee flexor. In Piston Squat it is important because of its hip flexion function.

Pectineus:

ONE LEG SQUAT ANATOMY

It is a small muscle of the mid-thigh, flexes the thigh and participates in a perfect Piston Squat execution.

Core Muscles Contracting

Rectus Abdominis:

ONE LEG SQUAT ANATOMY

Rectus Abdominis is a trunk flexor and in Piston Squat, it will help to maintain the posture.

Spinal Extensors:

Spinal Extensors

Spinal Extensors straightens the back so it is working against Rectus Abdominis to provide a balanced posture just what is required in Piston Squat.

Quadratus Lumborum:

ONE LEG SQUAT ANATOMY

Quadratus Lumborum when acting bilaterally flexes the trunk so it is also a posture muscle that will be contracting during Piston Squat.

Lower Leg Muscles Stretching

Gluteus Maximus:

Gluteus Maximus:

As discussed before, not only is it contracting to hold the position but it is also being lengthened. Its function is to extend the thigh but, in the squat, position the thigh is flexed so the muscle is stretching.

Adductor Magnus (Ischial Part):

Adductor Magnus

Ischial Part of Adductor Magnus extends the thigh bit in the flexed Piston Squat position, it is being stretched so requires flexibility.

Posterior Gluteus Maximus:

Posterior Gluteus Maximus:

Posterior Gluteus Maximus extends the thigh at the hip joint so you can imagine it being stretched.

Piriformis:

Piriformis:

Piriformis laterally rotates the leg during hip extension and abducts the leg during hip flexion. In Piston Squat, it is being stretched in the lower leg.

Lifted Leg Muscles Stretching

Hamstrings:

Hamstrings:

As you can see, the lifted leg is extended at the knee in the Piston Squat Position so every muscle that flexes the knee is being stretched including the Hamstrings.

Adductor Magnus (Ischial Part):

Adductor Magnus (Ischial Part)

The lifted leg remains flexed at the hip joint. Adductor Magnus being an extensor of the thigh is getting stretched here.

More Read ONE LEG SQUAT ANATOMY: https://easyflexibilityblog.com/2021/08/11/have-you-tried-the-exercise/

Gluteus Maximus ONE LEG SQUAT ANATOMY:

Gluteus Maximus:

Also, an extensor of the thigh so it will be stretched here.

Piriformis ONE LEG SQUAT ANATOMY:

Piriformis:

Piriformis as discussed above, abduct the leg during hip flexion that is bot happening here so it is stretched here.

Posterior Gluteus Medius ONE LEG SQUAT ANATOMY:

Posterior Gluteus Medius

Posterior Gluteus Medius is also an extensor of the hip. In the flexed position of the hip, it will be stretched.

Our Pistol Squat – One Leg Squat Program is Different!

This program demonstrates many different progressions, allowing you to customize exactly what you need to master the one leg squat fast.

Get it Now! Click on the picture below to Get Started!

Pike Jump Anatomy (Master Your Pike Position)

Pike Jump Anatomy: Pike Jump is one of the most challenging jumps to execute. It is a vertical jump with the body being flexed into a ‘Pike’ or a ‘Jackknife’.

In a Pike Jump, both legs need to be flexed at the hip joint simultaneously so that they are parallel to the floor and knees are locked. Arms are placed forward to create a folded position in the air and this motion is also called ‘candlesticks.

Pike Jump is performed in gymnastics, diving and in other sports as well. It’s hard because the two legs have to be stretched at the same time, with all the muscles restricting the hip flexion, are now restricting two times as much as they normally do.

Because of such a high resistance, trying to master the Pike Jump incorrectly will force the more flexible part of the body (lower back) and will bring a high-level possibility of injured lower back.

Not just you need flexibility while performing a Pike Jump, you also require strength in some muscles that contract during the execution of this beautiful stunt.

Let’s start the anatomy behind the Pike Jump.

Pike Jump Anatomy: Muscles Lengthening

Hamstrings:

Pike Jump Anatomy

Hamstrings are the prime extensors or the hip and flexors of the knee. Both of these actions are against what we want to achieve in Pike Jump. Therefore, Hamstrings are stretched so that the leg can be flexed and knees can be locked at extended position.

Adductor Magnus (Ischial Fibers):

Pike Jump Anatomy

The Ischial part of Adductor Magnus is also called the Hamstring part. It is also an extensor of the hip joint and hence need to be stretched only if it has enough flexibility.

Piriformis:

Pike Jump Anatomy

It is a muscle that rotates the leg during hip extension. But during Pike Jump, the legs are flexed at the hip so it will be lengthened.

Gluteus Maximus:

Pike Jump Anatomy

Gluteus Maximus along with its function of external rotation and abduction of the thigh, it is also an extensor of the hip joint. So, it gets stretched while executing Pike Jump.

Gluteus Medius (Posterior Fibers):

Pike Jump Anatomy

Posterior Fibers of Gluteus Medius work the same as the Gluteus Maximus. They also extend the leg at the hip joint. Therefore, need to have flexibility to be stretched during Pike Jump.

Gastrocnemius:

Pike Jump Anatomy

Gastrocnemius is the plantarflexor of the foot and flexor of the knee. In Pike Jump, the foot is being dorsiflexed and also knee is extended. So, it’s stretching.

Soleus:

Pike Jump Anatomy

It plantarflexes the foot just like Gastrocnemius and is stretching here.

Spinal Extensors (Lumbar):

The lumbar spine, as you can see, it flexed to achieve the shape of a Pike. For this, the Spinal Extensors of the lumbar spine need to be lengthened.

Muscles Contracting

Quadriceps:

Quadriceps (all 4 heads) are the antagonists of Hamstrings and act on the leg to flex it at the hip joint and are also powerful extensors of the knee. So, strength in the Quadriceps is important for Pike Jump.

Tensor Fascia Lata:

Tensor Fascia Latae

Tensor Fascia Lata is a hip flexor and also an abductor of the thigh. So, it is contracting in the Pike Jump.

Sartorius:

Sartorius

Sartorius is a hip flexor, but it also flexes the knee. It is unique due to this dual action. Due to its hip flexing function, it is contracting here and requires strength.

Pectineus:

Pectineus

The primary function of Pectineus is hip flexion so according to the trend, it will be contracted to achieve maximum hip flexion.

Psoas Major:

It is a major flexor of hip joint. It also flexes the trunk laterally. Both these movements are important in Pike Jump.

Iliacus:

Illiacus

Iliacus works with the Psoas Major in flexing the leg towards the trunk. Thus, playing major role in Pike Jump.

Adductor Magnus:

While flexing the legs during Pike Jump, the legs also need to be adducted. This is shown in the picture. So, you can guess the adductors will be working here. The prime adductor is Adductor Magnus. Its strength is crucial.

Read More: https://easyflexibilityblog.com/2021/08/11/have-you-tried-the-exercise/

Adductor Longus Pike Jump Anatomy:

Adductor Longus is also one of the leg adductor muscle group, performing the same function as Adductor Magnus.

Adductor Brevis:

This small Adductor also assists in pulling the medially. It belongs to adductor muscle group.

Gracilis Pike Jump Anatomy:

This strap like muscle acts as a strong adductor of the leg. So, it is also contracting along with other adductors.

Rectus Abdominis:

To achieve that folded state as in Pike Jump, the torso has to be flexed and Rectus Abdominis does the same function. Hence, having a strong Rectus Abdominis is important for it.

Obliques Pike:

When working bilaterally, Obliques also flex the torso and assist the Rectus Abdominis. Therefore, they are also important in Pike Jump.

Psoas Minor :

Psoas Minor is a small muscle. It assists in trunk flexion, allowing an individual to bend forward at the lumbar spine.

Spinal Extensors (Cervical and Thoracic):

Cervical and Thoracic Spinal Extensors will make sure that your upper spine remains erect during the Pike Jump. Their strength will play a key role.

Master your Pike Position Today! Click on the Picture below to get started!