True Front Split: Stop Cheating Yourself

You think you’re doing a split but you’re not! Stop cheating yourself! 10 issues that are preventing you from doing a True Front Split, reasons and solutions.

If you have been faking a split, you’re only cheating yourself. Here’s how to see if your True Front Split is fake or real.

I decided to write this article because over the years and few times recently people would send me a picture of their split. And when I tell them that they are not really doing a True Front Split, they get a little bit upset. It is somewhat of an unpleasant news when you think you have achieved a skill and someone in authority tells you that you have not.

This article will address how to spot and incorrect split. The various ways of seeing an incorrect split. Perhaps cheating is not the best term, simply because, not everyone is trying to cheat some people honestly believe that they have mastered a True Front Split. But True Front Split is a specific skill. Just because someone has their leg up doesn’t mean that they are doing a Kick. A Roundhouse Kick is not a Side Kick. A Back Attitude is not an Arabesque. Something that looks similar to something else is not exactly it.

I’m talking about some purely from extended position point of view and not from an actual skill. Because of course from the skill point of view you would see that a Roundhouse is not a Side Kick but sometimes people do something that’s in between. And the same applies to a True Front Split where there is a way to a little twist here, a little tweak there, a little bend here, a little rotation there. So, it’s best to know and it’s very simple. Here I’m going to address all the possible adjustments to lack of flexibility in specific muscle, or group of muscles, I have seen over the years.

True Front Split Strength & Flexibility Training at Home COMPLETE COMBO – ALL 3 LEVELS – BEGINNER, INTERMEDIATE, ADVANCED

It’s easy to get started!

If you are ready to do effortless Splits ANYTIME that you wish with a training method that is Easy, Pain Free and Fast, that is designed to work naturally with your body and keep your flexibility for years to come, then join thousands of satisfied EasyFlexibility practitioners and START YOUR TRAINING TODAY!

This Course includes the following step by step instructions for:

  • Beginner Split
  • Intermediate Split
  • Advanced Split (Beyond 180 degrees)

First, I need to describe what a target skill is before I talk about what it is not. Since there are people who will do this skill differently than I described, and then it’s not a mistake, it is just how the body is positioned for a specific style, or need, or requirement.

A description of a True Front Split is very simple. The hips are squared forward. One hip is not behind the other. They are at the same level. both legs the front and the back legs are straight. the kneecap of the front leg is pointing up. and the kneecap of the back leg is pointing down. ideally the back of the front leg and the front of the back leg are touching the floor.

Issue #1 – The Front Leg is Turned Out.

If ou perform the split in your style, in your school, with a turn out then it’s not a mistake for you. But according to a standardized description I gave earlier it is a mistake. There are people who can do a True Front Split on the floor, but they can only do it with the leg turned out. So, the kneecap is going to point to the side and not up to the ceiling. Assuming the whole structure is fine except for the front leg, then most likely the problem is in the Lateral Hamstring, the Long Head of the Biceps Femoris of the front leg. Yeah of course there are other muscles that rotate the hip out but usually they’re not the issue as much as the Long Head of the Lateral Hamstring. Now this is assuming that the whole structure is correct. If the whole structure is not correct, the hips are not even, and the back leg is turned out, or something else, we may have an issue coming from somewhere else and not the front leg although it is the front leg that is turned out.

Issue #2 – The Back Leg is Turned Out.

The kneecap is not facing down it’s facing out to the side. If this is how you perform your splits for your specific needs, it’s fine but it’s not a hip squared True Front Split it’s something else. If indeed you are trying to do a split as described above but you can only do it with your rear leg turned out, then of course the issue is in the muscles of the back leg that turn the hip out. It means that they are not flexible enough to allow the hip to turn in. Most often the issue is in the Tensor Fasciae Lata and in the Sartorius of the back leg. Both issues are easily fixed with isolating those muscles with Zaichik Stretching Techniques (ZST’s).

Just like with the front leg if the structure is off then the problem may not be in the back leg in those muscles it might be somewhere else we’re talking about everything is as described above except just for that back leg. Please keep in mind that we are talking about just the muscles here. We are not talking about the ligaments. We’re not talking about the scar tissue in the ligaments or anything else in the ligaments, just talking about the muscles.

Issue # 3 – Tight Hip Flexors and Adductors.

A cheating technique that looks good in the picture but it’s not a real split. Everything is good the hips are squared front leg turned in, back leg turned in, everything is good and yet the person is leaning forward and placing their body onto the front leg, so it looks like someone did a split and then just leaned forward if you look at just the end point of that on a picture.

But in actuality, this person might be cheating for the picture and I have seen quite a lot of people who do this this. They have very flexible front leg, very flexible extensors of the hip, hamstrings and other muscles that extend the hip, and yet they have very tight hip flexors and adductors, on the back leg. So they can’t do a split with their body being vertical so they lean forward and it looks like they just did that but they didn’t just do that they did it because they cannot be vertical because there is issue with the back leg flexibility.

On the side note there are a lot more people that have flexible hamstrings than flexible hip flexors and in some cases adductors. so when I meet people like that I recommend our hip flexors program big beginner or advanced depending on what they need because they already have good flexibility in their front leg and they need to focus on their back legs specifically to get a True Front Split.

True Front Split Strength & Flexibility Training at Home COMPLETE COMBO – ALL 3 LEVELS – BEGINNER, INTERMEDIATE, ADVANCED

It’s easy to get started!

If you are ready to do effortless Splits ANYTIME that you wish with a training method that is Easy, Pain Free and Fast, that is designed to work naturally with your body and keep your flexibility for years to come, then join thousands of satisfied EasyFlexibility practitioners and START YOUR TRAINING TODAY!

This Course includes the following step by step instructions for:

  • Beginner Split
  • Intermediate Split
  • Advanced Split (Beyond 180 degrees)

Issue #4 – The Hips Are Not Squared.

What I see very often is when people have hips that are not squared, they will still try to rotate the spine and turn toward the front leg. So that the shoulders are squared, but the hips will not be squared. What’s interesting is when hips are not squared, most likely the back leg is not going to be turned in. There’s going to be kneecap at least partially out to the side, maybe not completely, but at least partially.

The only exceptions I’ve seen to this is in children. children can get away with this a little bit because they can have hips that are not squared and yet have very good internal rotation of the back leg where there is still kneecap facing down and this is just because they have such a good internal rotation of the back leg. For most people if the hips and not squared the front of the back leg will not face down to the floor. The issue here in most cases is the front leg. the hip cannot be squared to the front leg, so you see the back leg doing turn out and the reason is usually the Lateral Hamstring of the front leg. sometimes these people can square the hips. But if they square the hips there’s going to be a problem popping up somewhere else and that’s usually there’s going to be a turn out of the front leg so if the front leg is the kneecap facing up the hips are not squared. And if the hips are squared the front leg will turn out. When I see that I know that it is a lateral hamstring, and if there is it’s a major problem it’s pretty easy to fix with the Zaichik Stretching Techniques focusing on the Lateral Hamstring. I could tell you that these techniques actually became quite popular especially with the people that are having this issue.

Issue # 5 – Sciatic Nerve

The other problem that I see and it’s a less common problem, but it does happen, is a problem was a sciatic nerve. We have a ZST that focuses on everything behind the knee but not the muscle. This is a very unique ZST, its actions are of what is not connected by the muscle. It’s not a true ZST in a sense of muscle, but it works very well for the people with the nerve or fascia issue who cannot do a True Front Split due to the problem with the front leg.

Issue # 6 – Front Leg is Bent

Another issue that can come up and it’s a lot less common is when the front leg is bent. A person has hips squared, both legs are turned properly, but the front leg is bent. Most often when you see that the front leg is bent you’ll also see a person leaning forward a little bit, and placing their hands on the floor.

Often than not although it looks like the front leg is not flexible because the knee is bent at the front leg it’s actually the back leg is not flexible and the person is forced to lean forward away from the inflexible back leg. And a little investigation is usually needed to see which muscles are tight on the back leg or if there is some kind of an issue with the hip joint that is not allowing a person to stay vertical.

True Front Split Strength & Flexibility Training at Home COMPLETE COMBO – ALL 3 LEVELS – BEGINNER, INTERMEDIATE, ADVANCED

It’s easy to get started!

If you are ready to do effortless Splits ANYTIME that you wish with a training method that is Easy, Pain Free and Fast, that is designed to work naturally with your body and keep your flexibility for years to come, then join thousands of satisfied EasyFlexibility practitioners and START YOUR TRAINING TODAY!

This Course includes the following step by step instructions for:

  • Beginner Split
  • Intermediate Split
  • Advanced Split (Beyond 180 degrees)

Issue # 7 – Lack of Flexibility in the Muscles of the Back Leg

The next issue is when a person who is performing the True Front Split is cheating with the back and hamstring flexibility. It’s rather common and happens a lot. If you are not looking for it you will miss it. It is very similar to the person who is leaning forward into the front leg, except now, instead of leaning forward, they come up. But they don’t come up by extending the back hip, they come up by hyperextending the spine. So the flexibility of their hamstrings is good, flexibility of their spine is good, but the flexibility of the muscles of their back leg is poor.

And the reason why this is so common is because a lot of people do the split by pushing into their hamstrings. Getting into a false split where the legs are 180 degrees apart, but the body is forward. so they know they have to get the body up to vertical and they begin to push the body up. For most people it’s a lot easier to hyperextend the spine then to extend the hip so the spine begins to get more flexible, and nothing happens at the hip. remember that there’s so many tight muscles in the hip and it’s very difficult to just stretch them altogether if you isolate them again with Zaichik Stretching Techniques it’s so much faster and simpler to stretch them and actually get flexibility in the hip and not fake it by extending the back.

Issue #8 – Front leg is not in front

So next issue, yes there are that many. When you watch people do splits for so many years, you spot many different little adjustments and mechanisms.

The next one looks like this the hip squared the back leg is turned in properly,
the front leg is turned in properly, but the font leg is not in front, the front leg is a little bit to the side. Standing behind the person and you looking at them the front leg is not hidden by the body when you’re staying behind them, it’s actually out to the side so you could see the front leg while watching a person from the back. And the issue again here usually is the lateral hamstring. I see people do that quite often. When a picture is taken from a side you cannot see it too well unless you know what to look for. But if you look at the person directly from the back or from the front you will see it. Again Lateral Hamstring is the problem here. Providing that the whole structure is correct if not the problem could be somewhere else and the focus should be on the Lateral Hamstring. But if there is a hyperextension of the spine and the problem is in the back hip then It’s not just the lateral hamstring where the issue is.

True Front Split Strength & Flexibility Training at Home COMPLETE COMBO – ALL 3 LEVELS – BEGINNER, INTERMEDIATE, ADVANCED

It’s easy to get started!

If you are ready to do effortless Splits ANYTIME that you wish with a training method that is Easy, Pain Free and Fast, that is designed to work naturally with your body and keep your flexibility for years to come, then join thousands of satisfied EasyFlexibility practitioners and START YOUR TRAINING TODAY!

This Course includes the following step by step instructions for:

  • Beginner Split
  • Intermediate Split
  • Advanced Split (Beyond 180 degrees)

Issue #9 – Torso is leaning to the side

And finally sometimes people do this little cheating mechanism where it looks like they’re in a split but from the side it’s hard to see. You could see it from the front that the body is not vertical. The torso is leaning one side. And this is usually to take the pressure off the opposite leg so if the right leg is in front and the person is leaning to the left to take the pressure off the front right leg. Person is leaning to the right it is to take the pressure off the back left leg. And it’s also another cheating mechanism.

#10 – Toes are pointed.

I was debating to talk about this point because the True Front Split is done different but this is about the pointing of the front foot or not. In other words, pushing the front toes, the toes of the front leg away from you or not. A lot of people perform the True Front Split with the toes pointed. I perform it with the toes pulled back. It’s easier to point the toes for most people than pull them back. If you point the toes because this is how you do it for your purpose, then it’s fine. But if you are trying to do a split with the toes pulled up and you are only pointing them because you cannot pull them up due to the lack of flexibility of the front leg then it’s also sort of a cheating mechanism.

Remember we’re all different and due to how the body is structured and what kind of occupation someone has or injury. Even infections, yes infections in the muscles and nerves and joints, there may be chronic infections. All of these factors can get a person to try to cheat a little bit one way or the other to kind of play up their strengths and play down the weakness to do a split but it may not be a a complete split as is described above.

If you are interested in using Zaichik Stretching Techniques to master your splits please click here

True Front Split Strength & Flexibility Training at Home COMPLETE COMBO – ALL 3 LEVELS – BEGINNER, INTERMEDIATE, ADVANCED

It’s easy to get started!

If you are ready to do effortless Splits ANYTIME that you wish with a training method that is Easy, Pain Free and Fast, that is designed to work naturally with your body and keep your flexibility for years to come, then join thousands of satisfied EasyFlexibility practitioners and START YOUR TRAINING TODAY!

This Course includes the following step by step instructions for:

  • Beginner Split
  • Intermediate Split
  • Advanced Split (Beyond 180 degrees)

Advantages of isolating muscles when stretching vs stretching multiple muscles at the same time.

Like many other blog posts this one comes from repeated questions that I would like to answer.

First of all, what is the difference between an isolated stretch versus non-isolated stretch?

Let’s look at concrete examples: A standard lunge stretch which targets a “hip flexor” is a non-isolated stretch. When you do a lunge, whether your back knee is on the floor, or your back knee is off the floor, and you try to move your hip forward, in front of the back knee you are stretching a lot of muscles at the same time. You are stretching the 6 hip flexors the 4 adductors, and possibly even some of the abductors, some of the anterior muscle groups located on the outside of your hip. So that is 10 muscles being stretched at the same time.

If you’ve tried this stretch and were not very successful in it you can probably understand why. Because a lot of strong type muscles are stretched at the same time. Now, if you wanted to isolate each one of those, you can. You can do them one by one, and if you did that, this would be isolated stretching techniques.

“Well how do you isolate these muscles? Is that even possible?”

Of course, the big question is “Well how do you isolate these muscles? Is that even possible?”. The answer is yes. Because these muscles all do different things it’s easy to isolate. Each muscle does something different. They all flex the hip, but some also adduct, abduct, internally rotate, externally rotate, some cross the knee, some don’t. By adjusting the position of your body, you can isolate these muscles. This will make the stretching a lot easier and usually with an instant progress seen.

In the EasyFlexibility Online Training Certification Course (EFTC) we cover all major muscles. How each one works. And using the kinesiology of the muscles, how to isolate them.

Another example would be a simple over the head shoulder flexibility or anatomical flexion of the shoulder. This is where you bring your arms straight up over your head. For example, simply pulling your arm over your head, such as when hanging from a bar. Or doing a one arm pull up, is stretching all the muscles together. Let’s call this a combination stretch.

Here, depending on position of the body, all these muscles get stretched at the same time: Latissimus Dorsi, Teres Major, Subscapularis, sternal part of Pectoralis Major, Pectoralis Minor, Rhomboids, even Levator scapulae, Posterior Deltoid, Infraspinatus, and Teres Minor. Some of them are movers of the shoulder joint, some of themare movers of the shoulder girdle, or the scapula, etc. And all of them are being stretched at the same time. Which makes for a very slow and inefficient progress.

Of course, all of these muscles can easily be isolated with the Zaichik Stretching Techniques. Zaichik Stretching Techniques (ZST’s) are all isolated stretches. ZST’s are not passive isolated stretches. Zaichik Stretching Techniques have Target and Leverage mechanisms. Without becoming too technical, the basic ZST modality implies that one move is the “helper”, this is your Leverage. And the other move is your Target, the direction where you want to get deeper. The helper or Leverage will move back and forth, the Target will always go deeper.

GET CERTIFIED AS AN EASYFLEXIBILITY INSTRUCTOR!

With our certifications you will be able to:

  • Teach at home!
  • Do one-on-one training sessions
  • Do group classes
  • Teach at your studio
  • The possibilities are endless!

THIS CERTIFICATION COURSE INCLUDES THE FOLLOWING:

  • Detailed instructions on how to teach, what to do, what not to do, how to properly put together training sessions.
  • FREE PROGRAMS of your choice: Your choice of digital videos is an added bonus to obtaining this certifications. It allows for a better idea of how Zaichik Stretching Techniques are combined to form specific routines.
  • Access to a Private Support Forum: Believe it or not – this is one of the most important elements of a program as it forms the right attitude towards the program. Upon registration for the course you gain an access to the private support forum, where you have a 24-hour active community to share your experience with, ask questions and seek advice.
  • Getting promoted for free on our social media (more than 250 thousand followers).
  • Listing in our private directory of EasyFlexibility Certified Instructors which allow you to be put on a list to be connected with potential clients that reach out to us.
  • Access to our STRETCH180 APP’s features for Instructors only to help with student retention.

It is a completely different story for someone who is older or someone who is very tight.

When someone is young and healthy and well warmed up, very often they get results just by doing a general over the head stretch. This doesn’t work all the time, but a young and healthy person can get flexible using regular static stretching. However, it is a completely different story for someone who is older or someone who is very tight.

Gymnasts are supposed to be very flexible. However, doing and iron cross, a muscle up, and many different power techniques that require extension, front lever being an example, make the muscles so tight that sometimes they have difficulty extending the arms overhead. While this may sound strange, I came across cases like these, and when that happens, isolating helps quite a lot. Doing ZST’s helps to bring the arms overhead and have a straight line. For example, doing handstand pushups without having a bent.

Another case where isolating makes a huge difference is if someone has an injury.

Another case where isolating makes a huge difference is if someone has an injury. I remember this one case where someone had an injury to their shoulder preventing the arm from being lifted for several months following the injury. There was a huge difference between the left and right side and ZST’s helped to focus on the tight muscles, isolate them, get good shoulder flexibility quickly and restore it to normal range of motion, where it was before the injury.

As people age, isolating the muscles and focusing on the tighter ones becomes more and more of a great tool. I remember another case where a tennis player had poor flexibility in the shoulder, and it was getting worse, to a point where it was becoming difficult to do proper serves. And in his case, it was actually the shoulder girdle that was causing the problem, not so much to shoulder joint. And when he was doing the general overhead stretch his tight muscles were not lengthening too much, but instead the loose ones were. This is what was putting pressure on the shoulder joint. To get his shoulder girdle moving, he did ZST’s specific to the Rhomboids, Levator scapulae and Pectoralis Minor. Following this program, his range of motion began to improve quickly and without pain, and playing tennis became a lot more enjoyable.

If you are interested in learning Zaichik Stretching Techniques which isolate muscles and use Target & Leverage mechanisms to stretch the muscles quickly and safely without pain then take a look at the EFTC.

GET CERTIFIED AS AN EASYFLEXIBILITY INSTRUCTOR!

With our certifications you will be able to:

  • Teach at home!
  • Do one-on-one training sessions
  • Do group classes
  • Teach at your studio
  • The possibilities are endless!

THIS CERTIFICATION COURSE INCLUDES THE FOLLOWING:

  • Detailed instructions on how to teach, what to do, what not to do, how to properly put together training sessions.
  • FREE PROGRAMS of your choice: Your choice of digital videos is an added bonus to obtaining this certifications. It allows for a better idea of how Zaichik Stretching Techniques are combined to form specific routines.
  • Access to a Private Support Forum: Believe it or not – this is one of the most important elements of a program as it forms the right attitude towards the program. Upon registration for the course you gain an access to the private support forum, where you have a 24-hour active community to share your experience with, ask questions and seek advice.
  • Getting promoted for free on our social media (more than 250 thousand followers).
  • Listing in our private directory of EasyFlexibility Certified Instructors which allow you to be put on a list to be connected with potential clients that reach out to us.
  • Access to our STRETCH180 APP’s features for Instructors only to help with student retention.

Proper Stretching Order of 4 Hip Muscle Groups. Can You Stretch Them All At The Same Time?

How do I open my hips?

I get this question a lot and since I’ve been in the field of stretching flexibility for many years I still get a question when it’s phrased in a specific way it’s confusing to me because I don’t know what people are really asking.

The question is “How do I open my hips”? At EasyFlexibility we have programs for each of the hip muscles, such as adductors, hip flexors or glutes. But when people use the phrase “How do I open my hips” it’s hard to tell what exactly do they mean. Do they want to be able to do a butterfly? A side split? Get flexible hip flexors? Or have a good turnout?

To get a better understanding so that I recommend the right program, I usually ask “Which muscles do you want to stretch? What is it that you want to do? What is your goal? Or what is it that you cannot do?” And 70 to 80% of the time the answer I get is “I want to be able to do everything. I want flexibility in all hip muscles, all of them”.

With EasyFlexibility programs we like to deliver flexibility results fast and safe, and a response of “I want flexibility in all the muscles” poses a problem. You see, the reason for this is because the muscles involved here are big muscles. You will see in a moment why it matters that these are big muscles. And there are many of them, there are 4 adductors, and 6 hip flexors, 4 hamstrings (although only 3 of them affect the hip), gluteus medius, gluteus minimus, gluteus maximus, deep six external rotators, etc.

The reason our programs are so effective is because we isolate each muscle at a time.

The reason our programs are so effective is because we isolate each muscle at a time. We don’t just do a lunge stretch and try to get all the hip flexors and a bunch of adductors at the same time. Which usually doesn’t go anywhere we isolate them and we see progress fast. But, because we isolate it takes time. Of course as you get better and better it takes less and less time but it still takes time if let’s say you’re doing a stretch for one hip flexor vs you doing 10 stretches. Now imagine if you’re doing a stretch for every muscle that takes a long time. So, instead, we focus on specific group of muscles, quickly develop flexibility there and move onto other group of muscles. There is a positive reinforcement because the flexibility is visible right away. The flexibility gained is maintained, so you keep it from session to session. Which keeps you motived to continue stretching and achieve your goals a lot faster than with any other system.

Hip Combo – Beginner Level

Six unique training routines at a special discount. This package contains everything you’ll ever need. Students and instructors alike prefer the Complete Hip Combo, as an amazing asset in their dancing improvement arsenal.

“I don’t care how long it takes; I still want to work on all of the muscles at the same time”

However, we usually don’t work on all the muscles at the same time because it takes a long time. Now somebody might say “I don’t care how long it takes; I still want to work on all of the muscles at the same time”

The second issue with trying to work on all hip muscles at the same time is that these are big muscles, a lot of mass, and when you do strength and flexibility exercises for them, and all our programs combine strength and flexibility. This works better than just stretching. What ends up happening is there are physiological changes in the muscles and they adjust to what you want from them. Those changes require Substance and that substance comes in form of food. So the more muscles you work on the less each muscle has to adjust, less nutrition it’s going to get and this will slow down the progress.

So even if you decide that you are going to spend that time and do all the Zaichik Stretching Techniques, all the supporting exercises, all the hip muscle is single workout, there will be a slow progress. This has been tested, and we’ve discovered it’s always better to focus on either the hip flexors or adductors, or the hamstrings, or the glutes, etc.,

Keeping in mind that exercises are exercises, besides needing the nutrition for recovery, you need more nutrition for the energy to actually train. To do the ZST’s. To do the supporting exercises. And if you’ve never tried Zaichik Stretching Techniques before you may be thinking “what energy does stretching take?”. Well ZST’s is not your typical stretching. In the Zaichik Stretching System you don’t just sit there holding a stretch for a long time hoping that your muscles will stretch. ZST’s are movement based, and movement takes energy.

“Can I stretch all the hip muscles at the same time and if not, how do I prioritize?”

If you decide to get the entire hip combo you may have a question of which program to do first. Based on my experience you would want to start with the glutes program, follow with the hamstrings program, then the adductors program, and then the hip flexors program.

If you wish to do two programs at the same time you would do the glutes and the iliotibial program together with the hamstrings program. Master the flexibility of your glutes, and your hamstrings, maintain this flexibility and then work on the flexibility of your adductors and your hip flexors together.

Hip Combo – Beginner Level
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Why is it easier to do a turn out in the second position than in the first position?

I got this question quite a lot of times, usually from bullet dancers “How come I can turn out a lot more in the second position, than I can in the first position?” For those of you who are not familiar with what these positions are but are still interested: The second position is where feet are wider apart. And the first position is where the feet are together.

The short answer is when you do the turn out with your feet together vs when you do the turn out with your feet apart, there are different muscles that need to be flexible. Of course, in the EasyFlexibility Turnout Program we focus on all the muscles that need to be flexible regardless of which position you are performing.

Ballet Turnout Strength & Flexibility Training At Home FROM EASIEST TO ADVANCED

This Ballet Turnout program will help you to be able to do a Turnout in Ballet, steadily, safely, painlessly and quickly with the use of the Proprietary Zaichik Stretching Techniques and Supporting Exercises.
  • See visible results in 1 to 3 easy follow along workouts.
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The muscles that are preventing you from doing a turnout are:

The muscles that want to turn in and thus prevent the turn out are your adductors: adductor longus, brevis, magnus, gracilis. Your hip flexor: Pectineus, Tensor Fascia Latter. And your abductors: Gluetus medius, gluteus minimus. The hamstrings also have a light effect on the rotation of the hip. But we can ignore them here because the hip is extended. If the hip was flexed, then the rotation factor would come into play.

So in short as your legs are wider apart your adductors and your pectineus, will need to be more and more flexible, for you to rotate out. And as your legs are closer together your gluteal group: Gluteus medius and gluteus minimus, as well as tensor fascia latte need to be more flexible. Tensor Fascia Latte, is a hip flexor, but it’s a funny hip flexor because It can also abduct. There are other hip flexors, that can abduct but they are not in the same group of preventing the external rotation with the feet together so we are not going to mention them.

Here is a reason why

What’s interesting is most people naturally have more flexible adductors and pectineus, then they do their abductors and tensor fascia latte. And for that reason as legs are wider apart most people will naturally have a better turn out as the legs are closer together, of course the muscles that are usually tight, have to be flexible. Most people don’t have this, so, the turn out will be worse when the legs are together or if the legs cross over with one leg being in front of the other.

Over the years people who use our programs have contacted us saying: “I got a perfect second position turn out very quickly, but while my first position has improved I don’t have 180 degree turn out what do I do?”

Well the beauty of Zaichik Stretching Techniques (ZST’s) is that the muscles can be isolated. With the ZST’s we can focus on the muscles that need to be flexible and will ignore the muscles that are already very flexible so the progress comes a lot faster.

With ZST’s you can isolate gluteus medius and minimus, and you can isolate tensor fascia latte. Once that is done, the progress comes very quickly and often people get a great first position turn out pretty quickly. While ZST’s stretch the muscle, the specialized supporting exercises help to retain the flexibility gained as well as build strength in the muscles.

Combining our proprietary ZST’s with the Supporting Exercises makes magic, and your flexibility gains increase tremendously fast. For more information about our Turnout Program please click here.

Ballet Turnout Strength & Flexibility Training At Home FROM EASIEST TO ADVANCED

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This Course includes the following step by step instructions for:

Ballet Turnout training program that will help you to train for turnout position, steadily, safely, painlessly and quickly with the use of the Proprietary Zaichik Stretching Techniques and Supporting Exercises.

“Why do I have the pain behind the knee?” The pain behind the knee when doing the true front split.

This is one of the most common questions that comes up about the True Front Split, I usually get questions like that pretty often.

The answer depends on many factors. First of all where is the pain behind the knee located? There are tendons on both sides. On the inside there is medial hamstrings, semi tendinosis and semi membrenosis, as well as gracilis and sartorius tendons. And also there is a tendon from the calf muscle. On the outside there is also a tendon from the calf muscle and the biceps femoris, long and shot head, the lateral hamstring.

If the pain is in these locations, chances are it has something to do with the tendons. Maybe the muscle is too tight maybe the muscle is contracting. Maybe the tendon is injured that is for somebody locally to test. Sometimes people feel the pain in the middle so it’s behind the knee but it’s right in the middle. There are various possibilities.

True Front Split Strength & Flexibility Training At Home COMPLETE COMBO – ALL 3 LEVELS – BEGINNER, INTERMEDIATE, ADVANCED

Learn how to do a True Front Split at home with a proven method that is guaranteed to take you from 0 to a 180 degree split and beyond. We can even predict the date that you’ll get your split!
  • See visible results in 1 to 3 easy follow along workouts.
  • Unique muscle by muscle isolation stretching techniques.
  • Fast Progress.
  • Permanent Results.
  • No Pain.
  • No Injuries.
  • Flexibility & Strength combined.
  • For all ages.
  • 30 – 40 minute workouts, 2 – 3 times a week.
  • All videos contain subtitles.
  • Train at home. At your pace. From any device.
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  • No hidden fees. No strings attached. No surprises.

Your leg does not hyperextend because ligaments do not allow that to happen.

Your leg does not hyperextend because ligaments do not allow that to happen. And in some styles of dance, dance instructors forcefully stretch the ligaments of the students to create a line of the hyperextended knee. If a ligament is injured, you will have pain behind the knee.

There’s also cartilage inside the knee joint and that cartilage is where your upper leg bone, your femur meets tibia, which is the larger of your two lower leg bones. Meniscus can get injured by forceful kicking, for example, or jumping and landing incorrectly, or forceful twisting movements of the knee, all these can injure the meniscus. And you may feel pain there.

Sometimes if a person is injured it can be a combination of multiple tissues not just one.

So, when there’s an injury your body wants to protect you from further injury, thus the muscles that flex the knee will set a specific length where they contract before you feel the pain before there is potential for further injury. What that simply means is that you will not be able to extend your knee straight and if you do there’s going to be discomfort.

Often when people contact me about this, I would say please go to your local health care practitioner and ask to do the imaging in most cases your health care provider will order the imaging if the description of your discomfort matches the need to see what is going on inside.

“I got an MRI done and there was an injury”

I do have people who write back to me and say “I got an MRI done and there was an injury” and then my advice would be the same as their health care practitioner “Do not touch that injury in terms of exercising it until it heals”.

This is difficult for people to do because, they have gotten some results, they got some improvement, and they are afraid to lose it. But if they don’t stop exercising, they may end up with a more significant injury which will set them back for months. Instead it is always best to stop and take a break, losing just a little bit of the flexibility gained, rather than suffering a long term ongoing injury.

On a few occasions, providing that there is doctor’s approval, and the injury is not to the muscle or the tendon, it is still possible to practice ZST’s. However, the person will need to be supervised by a Certified EasyFlexibility Instructor who understands exactly how to stretch with the ZST’s as not to touch the injured tissue. Nevertheless it is still best to avoid exercising all together as not to worsen the injury. Of course depending on the injuries there are various modalities that can speed up the healing. But this is a topic for a next blog post.

True Front Split Strength & Flexibility Training At Home COMPLETE COMBO – ALL 3 LEVELS – BEGINNER, INTERMEDIATE, ADVANCED

Learn how to do a True Front Split at home with a proven method that is guaranteed to take you from 0 to a 180 degree split and beyond. We can even predict the date that you’ll get your split!

It’s easy to get started!

If you are ready to do effortless Splits ANYTIME that you wish with a training method that is Easy, Pain Free and Fast, that is designed to work naturally with your body and keep your flexibility for years to come, then join thousands of satisfied EasyFlexibility practitioners and START YOUR TRAINING TODAY!

This Combo includes the following step by step instructions for:

  • Beginner True Front Split
  • Intermediate True Front Split
  • Advanced True front Split (Beyond 180 degrees)

How to learn to do the splits.

How to learn to do the splits

Many people ask how to learn to do the splits. Today I will answer this question. Most of you already know that on this blog we usually talk about mastering the splits in depths. Such as Kinesiology, Biomechanics and Physiology of splits training. However, today we will talk about the basics, and answer your question of “how to learn to do the splits”.

There are three different types of splits:

If you are just starting out learning how to do a split, you are probably wondering what type of splits exist. Well, there are three basic types of splits that beginners are interested in. These 3 basic splits are:

  • Open Front Split, also known as Turned Out Front Split
  • True Front Split, also known as Hanumanasana, Hip Squared Front Split
  • Side Split, also known as Sideways Split, Middle Split, Straddle Split, Center Split, Box Split.

It is very common for most stretching instructors trying to teach you how to do the splits to demonstrate a split and then ask you to assume the position of the split that you are trying to learn. Then try and force your body into a split. This usually leads to pain and lots of injuries. Our system of stretching is completely different. In the EasyFlexibility system we use a specific approach which is a combination of muscle isolation, proprietary Zaichik Stretching Techniques and special Supporting Strength and Movement exercises.

Side Split

how to the side split

Let’s first talk about the Side Split. A Side split, also known as a middle split, center split or box split will have you:

  • Sitting on your glutes with your legs out to the sides.
  • Your toes pointing up.
  • And hips rotated out

This is the most common type of split. There is another variation of the side split, which will have you sitting with your toes pointed forward.

True Front Split

learning how to do the true front split

There are two types of front splits. One is called a True Front Split. The other an Open Front Split. A True Front Split also knowns as Hips Squared Front Split. This type of front split is what most Gymnasts would want to learn.  A True Front Split will have you:

  • Sitting with one leg forward and one leg back
  • The hamstrings and glutes of your front leg will be in contact with the floor.
  • Your quadriceps, as well as your instep and your kneecap will be in contact with the floor.
  • Your torso is naturally facing the front leg.
  • There’s no rotation in your spine.
  • Here your body is simply naturally facing forward.

Open Front Split

learning how to do the open front splits

Now let’s talk about the Open Front Split. Open Front Split is more common in dance or ballet, for example. This type of split will have you:

  • Sitting on the floor with hips open.
  • One hip behind the other hip.
  • Your front toes are pointing up.
  • Your rear kneecap will not be down like in the True Front Split. In an Open Front Split your rear kneecap will be out to the side.
  • In this type of split, it is not your quadricep that is making contact with the floor but, the inside of your knee, and possibly your inner thigh.

How to learn to do the splits:

Now that you are aware of the three types of splits that exist, let’s talk about how to learn to do the splits.

It is very common for most stretching instructors trying to teach you how to do the splits to demonstrate a split and then ask you to assume the position of the split that you are trying to learn. Our system of stretching is completely different. In the EasyFlexibility system we use a specific approach which is a combination of muscle isolation, proprietary Zaichik Stretching Techniques and special Supporting Strength and Movement exercises.

Standard methods of learning how to do the splits:

learning how to do the splits

What you will find offered by various stretching instructors out there is a standard stretching approach of forcing your body into a split.  You will find this case scenario very common, where you go to a stretching instructor asking her to teach you how to do a split only to experience the following.

Let’s take learning to do a True Front Split for example. The instructor will demonstrate a True Front Split and then as, you to assume that position. Of course, since you are just starting out your split will look nothing like the instructors. Most likely you will be high off the floor with your front and back legs bent at the knee and won’t be able to go further into a split. The instructor, however, will either have you hold that position hoping that eventually with a little bit of luck and some miracles you’ll drop into a split. Or worse, they will physically try to force your poor muscles into a split, which most of the time will result in pain and injuries. This is a very basic very primitive approach. However, it is still practiced by various instructors.

A little bit better approach is to focus on the front leg by itself, and then the back leg by itself. Still other instructors will take learning a split a little bit further by using the various modalities such as PNF. Where they will ask you to contract your muscles and then release them and try to go deeper into the split. This has been considered a new method of training for decades. Most instructors do not go past this point. This is the most that they would do for their students.

Learning a Side Split or an Open Front Split would be done the same way except for a different position. For example, for a Side Spit, Middle Split, Box Split or Center Split: A student might try to assume a split when the legs out and hold it and try to drop down to the lowest possible position. Hoping that somehow the muscles will stop fighting him and let him come down into the split. There are people that have been trying to learn the split this way for many years without getting any results.

Through my 30 years of training and teaching how to do the splits, I have seen this many times. If someone is going to apply contractions for example, a person will assume the same position. Then try to squeeze into the floor and come down deeper. As the muscles fatigue and let go a little bit.

Then there is another approach to learning how to do the split. I see this very commonly in Martial Arts schools. Where students would sit in a straddle and they would stretch to one leg touch, to another leg, and then forward. Then try to get deeper into the split. This is a little bit better approach because, at least there is some isolation to the muscles. This approach works better than simply trying to push down into the split without doing anything else.

Is there a better, easier, faster and safer way how to learn to do the splits?

learning how to do the splits

Again our approach is completely different! In the EasyFlexibility system of stretching we understand that if only one muscle is tight this one tight muscle will be the culprit to you doing a split! Therefore, using outdated methods of stretching multiple muscles at the same time will fail and you will not get your split that way no matter how long you keep forcing yourself into a split.  

With the Zaichik Stretching Techniques (ZST’s) we isolate each muscle. The exciting thing about the ZST’s is that it is not just muscle isolation. It is also a very quick way to go deeper into the stretch by getting around the stretch reflex.

If you’re not familiar with a stretch reflex. A stretch reflex is triggered when the muscle contracts. This prevents you from going deeper into the stretch.

ZST’s go around the stretch reflex so that there is no pain and there’s no resistance. What’s more, with our system of stretching at each training session you don’t’ start from square one. Every time you train with our programs you will not only gain flexibility, you will also get to keep your flexibility gains until your next session. Which means, that you will get a little bit deeper into your split at each workout!

The reason that you are able to retain your flexibility is because we use special flexibility and strength supporting exercises with the Zaichik Stretching Techniques. This allows you to retain your flexibility and apply it to your target sport.

In Conclusion

In conclusion there are different ways to learn how to do a split and it is up to you to decide which method of learning how to do the splits you would like to go with.

This Online On Demand Video Training Course Contains:

Side Split Intermediate Program

In this training program you will continue to improve your split going above the 135 degrees that you’ve gained in the beginner level. Here you will learn a set of new conditioning exercises, ZST’s and Supporting exercises to help you keep your newly found flexibility. 

135 – 180 Degrees

Open Front Split Intermediate Program

 In this training program you will continue to improve your split going above the 135 degrees that you’ve gained in the beginner level. Here you will learn a set of new conditioning exercises, ZST’s and Supporting exercises to help you keep your newly found flexibility. 

135 – 180 Degrees

True Front Split Intermediate Program

 In this training program you will continue to improve your split going above the 135 degrees that you’ve gained in the beginner level. Here you will learn a set of new conditioning exercises, ZST’s and Supporting exercises to help you keep your newly found flexibility.. 

135 – 180 Degrees

Look inside this training program:

In each program you will learn:

Mobility Exercises

Mobility exercises for each joint, to keep your joints healthy and lubricated.

Skill Specific Warmup

Skill Specific warmup exercises to gradually prepare your body for a split. 

Zaichik Stretching Techniques

Proprietary stretching techniques, for each muscle involved in a split, so that your flexibility improves right away without pain.

Unique Flexibility & Strength Supporting Techniques

Special techniques that allow you to retain your newly gained flexibility and connect it to your target skill. 

Plus when you sign up for this course you will also get these bonuses:

Stretch180 App

Flexibility Measurement App Online. This app will measure your splits accurately and tell you how many degrees you are progressing each training session. Track your progress. Give you an estimated date for full splits. Keep you engaged and motivated with your flexibility training. And keep you focused on your EasyFlexibility Goals!

Support Group

Access to a Private Support Group: No longer will you train alone. Now you can be part of a group and train alongside other EasyFlexibility practitioners. Once registered for this course you will gain access to a private support group, where you will find 24-hour active community to share your experience with, ask questions and get advice. 

Lifetime Access

Once purchased, this course is your to keep forever! There are no hidden fees and no strings attached. You will not be billed monthly, you pay only one time and get unlimited lifetime access to this program which is kept for you in your very own online library for easy access on any device of your choice, anytime, anywhere. 

Try a Free Zaichik Stretching Technique called ~Content~ from the EasyFlexibility Side Split Training Program right now!

IT’S EASY TO GET STARTED!

If you are ready to do effortless Splits ANYTIME that you wish with a training method that is Easy, Pain Free and Fast, that is designed to work naturally with your body and keep your flexibility for years to come, then join thousands of satisfied EasyFlexibility practitioners and START YOUR TRAINING TODAY!

This Course includes the following step by step instructions for:

  • Intermediate Side Split
  • Intermediate Open Front Split
  • Intermediate True Front Split

Why do muscles shake during a stretching workout?

why do muscles shake during a stretching workout?

I got this question a few times: “Why do muscles shake during a stretching workout” and decided to answer it in today’s article. Muscles can shake during or after a stretching exercise just like they can shake during a strength training exercise.

Strength Training vs Stretching Workout – Understand why your muscles shake

Although, you want to know why your muscles shake during a stretching workout. It is first important to understand why your muscles shake during strength training exercises. Knowing this, will help you to understand the reason why your muscles shake during a stretching workout.

Although, you want to know why your muscles shake during a stretching workout. It is first important to understand why your muscles shake during strength training exercises. Knowing this, will help you to understand the reason why your muscles shake during a stretching workout.  

You may notice that if you lift to failure, meaning that you do as many repetitions as you can until you can’t do anymore, your muscles may shake. If you lift very heavy, even a few repetitions, again you may experience shaking.

I can bore you with the science behind it. But, the bottom line is this, if your muscles shake it means that you are pushing your body beyond what it is used to. Muscles shaking during a strength training workout can be neurological. Stemming from your nervous system trying to recruit as many model units as possible to complete the task. Muscles shaking during a strength training workout can also be due to nutrient deficiencies, dehydration, low blood sugar, etc., but I personally do not see that very often.

The Stretch Reflex – Reason why your muscles shake during a stretching workout.

Now let’s talk about why the muscles shake during a stretching workout. The reason is the same but in a slightly different context.  When you do a passive relaxed stretch such as in yoga and try to force stretch, meaning go deep beyond your comfort level, the muscles are not going to respond well and there’s going to be what is known as a “stretch reflex”. The stretch reflex is the reason why most people’s muscles shake during a stretching workout.

The Stretch Reflex muscles shaking during stretching workout

When you do a passive relaxed stretch such as in yoga and try to force stretch, meaning go deep beyond your comfort level, the muscles are not going to respond well and there’s going to be what is known as a “stretch reflex”. The stretch reflex is the reason why most people’s muscles shake during a stretching workout

So, what happens during a stretch reflex?  The muscles contract and they do not want to allow the stretch to go deeper. The harder you pull the more the muscles contract. When they contract as much as possible, they begin to shake!

The same thing happens when you are doing a stretching exercise. During a stretching exercise your muscles contract and you’re trying to stretch them but they’re trying to contract. This has always been my issue with relaxed stretching, they are good for many things but not so great for flexibility gains.

Passive stretching does not build flexibility

I personally do not experience muscles shaking during a stretching workout, and neither do any of the EasyFlexibility practitioners, because I do not use relaxed stretches or passive stretches for flexibility. I have given up doing that many years ago even before I came up with the concept of the Zaichik Stretching Techniques.

Zaichik Stretching Techniques (ZST’s), as you may already know, do not produce the stretch reflex. Thus, your muscles will not shake during a stretching workout with the ZST’s. In ZST’s there is no holding this constant movement, and the stretch reflex does not set in. Because of this the muscles don’t get a chance to start opposing and eventually shaking thereby eliminating muscle shaking during a stretching workout.

I’m going to give my personal opinion here. I’m not a fan of muscle shaking during strength exercises. And I’m even more against muscles shaking during stretching exercises.  To me muscles shaking during strength exercises means that I am doing too much. But then again, I’m not a competitive athlete so I’m only speaking for myself.  

I personally do not experience muscles shaking during a stretching workout, because I do not use relaxed stretches or passive stretches for flexibility. I have given up doing that many years ago even before I came up with the concept of the Zaichik Stretching Techniques.

If you are going to use passive relaxed stretches for flexibility gains you have to do them for a short period of time, many times. Instead of sitting there and forcing the stretch. Because, there is a very high chance, that if you fight with your muscles, you can injure them. And if you don’t injure your muscles right away you may just make them sore and still not gain any flexibility.

From the many years of research that I have done, and over 30 years of experience in the field of flexibility. I can tell you this with absolute certainty. That if your primary goal is to get flexible and retain your flexibility. Continuing to use passive relaxed stretches, especially to the point of muscle shaking, is not an optimal way of developing flexibility.

Relaxed Passive stretches may lead to Injuries if used the wrong way!

If you are lucky enough to not get injured the first time when you fight with your muscles. And continue to force stretch. Your muscles will begin shaking during a stretching workout. Eventually they will fatigue and let you get a little bit more flexible. But, your poor muscles will be so sore that you won’t be able to do anymore stretches for a while. This will of course set you back for a certain amount of time. And if you don’t wait until you are not sore anymore and keep on stretching, you are almost guaranteed to injure a muscle or a tendon. Not to mention that you will again experience muscles shaking during a stretching workout. Which is what you are trying to avoid in the first place!

I’m going to make this point again about the passive relaxed stretches. Passive relaxed stretches should be used for what they have been intended for. That is to calm down the nervous system, and help the body relax after a workout. From the many years of research that I have done, and over 30 years of experience in the field of flexibility. I can tell you this with absolute certainty. That if your primary goal is to get flexible and retain your flexibility. Continuing to use passive relaxed stretches, especially to the point of muscle shaking, is not an optimal way of developing flexibility.

- Paul Zaichik is an Exercise Science Expert, author of multitude of books, and the creator of Zaichik Stretching Technique (formerly known as Kinesiological Stretching Technique). His specialty is flexibility training as well as body weight conditioning. His innovative method is designed to have maximum carry over into specific athletic techniques. Paul is the author of books and DVD’s on the topic of flexibility, martial arts and bodyweight training. Over the years, Paul Zaichik has worked with a variety of individuals including athletes, entertainers, and military personnel. His ElasticSteel Method of Athletic Conditioning. Zaichik Stretching Techniques and programs are used worldwide by both professional and amateurs with great success. For more information about the Zaichik Stretching Techniques please visit <a href="http://www.EasyFlexibility.com">www.EasyFlexibility.com</a>
– Paul Zaichik is an Exercise Science Expert, author of multitude of books, and the creator of Zaichik Stretching Technique (formerly known as Kinesiological Stretching Technique). His specialty is flexibility training as well as body weight conditioning. His innovative method is designed to have maximum carry over into specific athletic techniques. Paul is the author of books and DVD’s on the topic of flexibility, martial arts and bodyweight training. Over the years, Paul Zaichik has worked with a variety of individuals including athletes, entertainers, and military personnel. His ElasticSteel Method of Athletic Conditioning. Zaichik Stretching Techniques and programs are used worldwide by both professional and amateurs with great success. For more information about the Zaichik Stretching Techniques please visit www.EasyFlexibility.com

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High Front Kick Anatomy

A Front Kick anatomy is a kick used by martial artists around the globe in which the knee is lifted forward while keeping the foot and shin either dropping freely or pulled to the hip, and then straightening the leg in front of the executor and striking the target. After striking the target, the leg is retracted back to avoid grappling by the opponent.

This kick anatomy requires straight and balanced upper body. Strength as well as flexibility are important in many muscle groups of the body specially of the leg and core. The muscles are needed to be conditioned in correct progression. You can check out our kicking programs about Front Kick where you are taught by professionals the exact exercises to condition your muscles. 

In this article, we are going to talk about the muscles involved during the execution of a High Front Kick, because without the knowledge of the muscles, you can not start working on the kick efficiently. 

Kicking Leg Muscles Contracting to Bring The Knee Up (while chambering the kick)

Tensor Fascia Lata:

kick Tensor Fascia Latae

Tensor Fascia Lata is an internal rotator as well as abductor of the leg. During Front Kick’s execution, it will bring the knee up and help in the chambering of the kick.

Psoas:

PSOAS

Psoas muscles are flexors of the thigh at hip joint and while executing the Front Kick, they will contract to bring the knee up.

Iliacus:

Iliacus

Iliacus works with Psoas muscles in flexing the thigh. So, it is also contracting.

Pectineus:

Kick Anatomy pectineus

Pectineus is another muscle of anterior compartment whose main function is to flex the thigh at the hip joint. Here, it is also contracting.

Rectus Femoris:

Rectus Femorus

Rectus Femoris is another flexor of the leg at hip joint that will ne contracting here.

Sartorius kick Anatomy:

Sartorius

Sartorius, just like other muscles contracting to bring the knee up, is also a flexor of the thigh.

Kicking Leg Muscles Contracting to Flex The Knee (while chambering the kick)

Hamstrings:

Hamstrings

While chambering the kick, Hamstrings, that are the flexors of the knee, will contract to flex the knee.

Gastrocnemius kick Anatomy:

Gastrocnemius kick Anatomy:

Gastrocnemius is a Calf muscle that is also a flexor of the knee and it will also contract during chambering the kick. 

Kicking Leg Muscles Stretching (while chambering the kick)

Three Head of Quadriceps: 

Three heads of Quadriceps except the Rectus Femoris will be stretched while chambering the kick because they act as extensors of the knee.

Gluteus Maximus:

Gluteus Maximus is an extensor of the thigh at hip joint so it will also be lengthening while the kick is being chambered.

Adductor Magnus (ischial fibers):

Adductor Magnus

The Ischial Fibers of Adductor Magnus act as extensors of the thigh unlike it’s other part so they will be stretching. 

Supporting Leg Muscles Contracting

Adductors Kick Anatomy:

adductors

Adductors like Adductor Magnus, Adductor Longus, Adductor Brevis and Gracilis will contract eccentrically since the pelvis is tilted up on the kicking side.

Core Muscles Contracting

Abdominals (right side):

core

The Abdominals main function is flexion of the core and if acting on one side, flex the trunk laterally at that side. As the pelvis is tilted at right side, only the right sided Abdominals will contract.

Kicking Leg Muscles Contracting (while throwing the kick)

Three Heads of Quadriceps:

kicking leg

Unlike during chambering of the kick, the three heads of Quadriceps will be contracting during throwing the kick because it requires the extension of the knee and Quadriceps contract to provide the extension.

Also Read More About: https://easyflexibilityblog.com/category/splits/

Kicking Leg Muscles Lengthening (while throwing the kick)

Hamstrings Kick Anatomy:

Hamstrings Kick Anatomy

Hamstrings will be lengthening while kick is being thrown as they are flexors of the knee and the opposite is happening unlike what happened during chambering the kick.

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kick online training

Russian Split Anatomy

Russian Split, also known as Horizontal or Saddle Split, is one of the most famous pylon tricks in the world and perhaps one of the most beautiful splits. Russian Split anatomy is named so because it first began to appear first in the competition by Russian Pole Dancers.

It is an extremely complex move to execute and requires a lot of practice and correct progression. The complexity comes from the fact that you need not only a good stretch but also strong arms to keep your body in a horizontal position. You also need to make sure that the supporting leg does not slip. In Russian Split anatomy, your legs spread widely horizontally so that your hips can sink deeply into the floor. 

So, in order to perfect it, you need to focus on daily stretches that improve the flexibility of restricting muscles discussed later in the article. It is important to work on the Russian Split in the correct progression. 

So, let’s start with the muscles behind the Russian Split anatomy.

Muscles Lengthening in the leg proximal to the pole

Russian Split Anatomy Hamstrings:

Hamstrings Russian Split

Hamstrings are the extensors of the leg at the hip joint but the leg proximal to the pole in Russian Split is hyper flexed and that is why the Hamstrings are being lengthened here.

Adductor Magnus (ischial fibers):

Russian Adductor magnus

The Ischial fibers of Adductor Magnus act just like Hamstrings as extensors of the leg at the hip joint that will also be stretched while executing the Russian Split anatomy.

Gluteus Maximus:

Russian Gluteus Anatomy

Another extensor of the hip will also be lengthening in the proximal leg.

Piriformis:

Russian Piriformis Splits

This muscle abducts the leg during hip flexion and that is why it is also being stretched in the proximal leg.

Gluteus Medius (posterior fibers):

Medius Posterior Fiberas Russian

The posterior fibers of Gluteus Medius also act as extensors of the thigh and so, are stretching during the Russian Split in the proximal leg.

Muscles Lengthening in the leg distal to the pole – Russian Split Anatomy

Psoas Major:

Russian Psoas Major

Psoas Major is a major flexor of the thigh at the hip joint and as we can see, the distal leg is extended, so Psoas Major is lengthening in the distal leg.

Iliacus:

Iliacus Russian

Rectus Femoris assists the Iliopsoas in flexion of the leg. It also gets stretched due to being a flexor.

Sartorius:

Russian Split Anatomy

Sartorius is both a hip and knee flexor and as we know both hip and knee are extended in the distal leg so it will be lengthened strongly.

Pectineus: A Best Russian Split Anatomy

Russian Split Anatomy

Pectineus when contracts, flexes and adducts the leg at the hip joint. This is why it is stretching in the distal leg.

Tensor Fascia Latae:

Russian Split Anatomy

Tensor Fascia Latae will be lengthening in the distal leg due it’s one of the functions of being a flexor of the hip joint.

Adductor Magnus:

Russian Split Anatomy

It is a prime adductor of the leg and in the distal leg, it will be restricting the movement important for the Russian Split anatomy thus, it will be lengthening.

Adductor Longus:

Russian Split Anatomy

The Adductor Longus will also get lengthened.

Adductor Brevis:

Russian Split Anatomy

Like the other Adductors, this small adductor muscle is also being stretched in the distal leg.

Gracilis:

Russian Split Anatomy

Gracilis is a long, strap-like muscle that provides strong adduction and thus, is stretching in the distal leg.

Dorsiflexion:

Russian Split Anatomy

As the feet are in a plantarflexed position, the Dorsiflexors are being lengthened. 

Muscles stabilizing the position

Flexors of the fingers:

Russian Split Anatomy

The flexors of the fingers play a very crucial role in stabilizing the position as they help in making a stronger grip so that the practitioner doesn’t slip down.

Soleus:

Russian Split Anatomy

Soleus assists in plantarflexion of the foot and here it will help the foot of the proximal leg to come into a position that will help in stabilizing the position.

Gastrocnemius:

 Gastrocnmius Russian Splits

The gastrocnemius is the other plantar flexor of the foot that will position the foot of the proximal leg on the pole so that the position can be stabilized.

Rectus Abdominis:

Russian Rectus splits

Prime flexors of the trunk will help to defy the gravitational pull and keep the core in a horizontal position.

Obliques:

Russian Obliques Splits

The Obliques are the flexors of the trunk if acting bilaterally and they will help in opposing the downward movement of the body and resist the gravity.

Triceps:

Russian Triceps split

Triceps are the extensors of the forearm that will make sure that the forearm stays extended on one side. It also helps in stabilizing the position.

Pectoralis Major (sternal):

Sternal Russian Split

The sternal head of Pectoralis Major acts as an adductor that will work with some other muscles in adducting the arms so that the pole can be held and hence, stabilizing the position of Russian Split.

Latissimus Dorsi:

Russian Split Latissimus

Latissimus Dorsi is a big muscle that will produce adduction and internal rotation of the arms. This assists in stabilizing the position.

Teres Major:

Teres Major Split Russian

Teres Major acts as an internal rotator and adductor of the arms and it will be contracting on both sides to produce the internal rotation and thus, stabilizing the position.

Rhomboids:

Rhomboids Russian Split

Rhomboids retract, rotate, and elevate the scapula which are very important movements in stabilizing the position of the Russian Split.

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Medial Russian Split

Cheerleading Scorpion Pose Anatomy

The Scorpion Pose is a beautiful cheerleading flyer position and also one of the most difficult ones. The Flyer holds the top of her foot with both hands and pull the foot up towards her head behind her. Her chest should be up and she should be looking at the crowd. The Scorpion is performed facing the side so that the crowd can see the beautiful extension of the leg.

The Scorpion requires a cheerleader to have a tremendous amount of body flexibility as well as be able to maintain balance on one leg. The Scorpion is an advanced level stunt that requires flexibility in order to hold the position. Even after mastering the Scorpion, it is necessary to keep working on the flexibility otherwise you may quickly lose it. This position calls for deep flexibility of the hip flexors and flexors of the spine. Moderate hamstrings flexibility of the supporting leg is called up on as well. The pose can be helped by having flexible shoulder extensors. In Yoga, this pose is known to benefit the lungs, as well as many other organs and structures.

Due to so many areas of concentration, many people find this pose rather challenging. The reason being incorrect training. The most common way to train this pose is to force the body into it. This is often achieved by assuming a position closely resembling it and pulling as hard as possible for as long as possible, hoping for the results to come one day. Kinesiological stretching takes a different approach.

The knowledge of the muscles contracting and lengthening during the Scorpion is important before you start practising on this technique.

Supporting leg’s muscles contracting while lengthening

Hamstrings Scorpion Pose:

Scorpion Pose Hamstrings Muscles

Hamstrings contract to extend the thigh at the hip joint. During the execution of the Scorpion Pose, it will be contracting while lengthening in the supporting leg.

Gluteus Medius:

Scorpion Pose Gluteus Medius

Gluteus Medius is a prime mover of abduction at the hip joint that also acts as flexor of the hip and its posterior fibers act as extensors of the hip. It is also being contracted while lengthening.

Gluteus Minimus:

Scorpion Pose Mimimus

Works just the same as Gluteus Minimus. Thus, it is also contracting while lengthening in the supporting leg.

Adductor Magnus (ischial fibers):

Scorpion Pose Ischial Fibers

Ischial fibers of Adductor Magnus act as Hamstrings and produce extension of the leg at the hip joint. 

Lifted Leg’s muscles contracting while lengthening

Quadriceps Scorpion Pose:

Scorpion Pose Quadriceps

Quadriceps work with Iliopsoas to produce flexion of the leg at hip joint. But the lifted leg is hyperextended during Pose and that is why Quadriceps are contracting while lengthening.

Iliacus:

Scorpion Pose Illiacus

Just as the Quadriceps, Iliacus is also a flexor of the hip joint and it will also be contracting while lengthening.

Psoas:

Scorpion Pose Psoas

Psoas is a prime flexor of the thigh. The hyperextension of the leg will obviously stretch it.

Tensor Fascia Latae:

Scorpion Pose Tensor

Tensor Fascia Latae is a gluteal muscle that helps in flexion of the thigh at hip joint. Because of this reason, it will also be contracting while being lengthened.

Sartorius:

Scorpion Pose Sartorius

Sartorius is both a hip and knee flexor so it will also be included in the group of muscles contracting while lengthening.

Gracilis:

Scorpion Pose Gracilis

Gracilis is a strong adductor of the leg and the Scorpion Pose will stretch it as well in the lifted leg.

Adductor Magnus:

Scorpion Pose Mangnu

Adductor Magnus is a prime adductor of the leg and just like Gracilis, it is also being contracted while lengthening.

Adductor Longus:

Scorpion Pose Adductor Longus

Adductor Longus does the same action as Adductor Magnus and undergoes same contraction while lengthening in the lifted leg.

Adductor Brevis:

Scorpion Pose Adductor Brevis

Adductor Brevis is another adductor that will be contracting while lengthening.

Upper body’s muscles contracting while lengthening

Rhomboids:

Scorpion Pose Rhomboids

Rhomboids help in retraction and elevation of scapula. It is also one of the muscles that will be contracting while lengthening during the Scorpion.

Pectoralis Major:

Scorpion Pose Pectoralis Major

Pectoralis Major causes adduction and depression of the arm and exactly the opposite is happening in the Scorpion Pose and so it is contracting while lengthening.

Pectoralis Minor:

Scorpion Pose Pectoralis Minor

Pectoralis Minor draws the Scapula anteroinferiorly and is being contracted while stretching.

Triceps:

Scorpion Pose Triceps

Triceps act as extensors of the forearm but here the forearm is contracted so it is contracting while lengthening as well.

Latissimus Dorsi:

Scorpion Pose Lattisimus Dorsi

Latissimus Dorsi works with other muscles to produce adduction and medial rotation of the arm. Hence, it is contracting while lengthening.

Posterior Deltoid:

Scorpion Pose Posterior Deltoid

Posterior Deltoid helps in extension and horizontal abduction of the arm. It is also contracting while lengthening.

Core’s muscles contracting while lengthening

Rectus Abdominis:

Scorpion Pose Rectus Abdominis

Rectus Abdominis is a strong flexor of the trunk. The trunk can be seen in extended position and thus, Rectus Abdominis is being contracted while lengthening.

Internal Oblique:

Scorpion Pose Internal Obliques

Internal Oblique when contracting bilaterally, produces flexion of the trunk thus lengthening.

External Oblique:

Scorpion Pose External Obliques

External Oblique is another flexor of the trunk contracting while lengthening during the execution of Scorpion.

Psoas Minor:

Scorpion Pose Psoas Minor

Psoas Minor assists in trunk flexion and here, it will be contracting while lengthening.

Supporting Leg’s muscles contracting to hold the position

Quadriceps:

Scorpion Pose Quadriceps

Quadriceps are flexors of the thigh at the hip joint. It will be contracting to hold the position and maintain balance.

Tensor Fascia Latae:

Scorpion Pose Tensor Fascia

Tensor Fascia Latae is a flexor of the leg as well as an abductor, also contracting to hold the position.

Lower leg and foot muscles:

Scorpion Pose leg and foot muscles

Lower leg and foot muscles like plantarflexors and dorsiflexors are also involved in holding the position.

Lifted Leg’s muscles contracting to hold the position

Gluteus Maximus:

Scorpion Pose Gluteus Maximus

Gluteus Maximus assists in extension of the leg and it is specially important during the Pose in the lifted leg as it is hyperextending. 

Hamstrings Scorpion Pose:

Hamstrings

Hamstrings are prime extensors of the thigh so they are also contracting to hold the position.

Soleus Scorpion Pose:

 soleus

Soleus is a plantarflexor of the foot and it can be seen in the picture that the lifted foot is plantarflexed so, Soleus is contracting.

Gastrocnemius:

Gastroncnemius

Gastrocnemius is another plantarflexor of the foot that will be contracting to hold the position.

Core’s muscles contracting to hold the position

Spinal Extensors:

Spinal Extensors

To lift the chest up, the Spinal Extensors need to contract that will be extending the spine against gravity. 

Upper body’s muscles contracting to hold the position

Serratus Anterior:

Serratus Anterior

Serratus Anterior protracts and upwardly rotates the scapula and also plays a role in overhead abduction and this is a very important movement to hold the position in Scorpion Pose

Trapizeus:

 Trapezius

Trapizeus is a large muscle. The function of the trapezius is to stabilize and move the scapula. The upper fibers can elevate and upwardly rotate the scapula and extend the neck. The middle fibers adduct (retract) the scapula. It will contract to hold the position.

Scorpion Pose

Infraspinatus:

Infraspinatus

It is a rotator cuff muscle that helps in external rotation of the arm and stabilizes the shoulder joint. Here especially, it will help in holding the position.

Scorpion Pose

Teres Minor:

Teres Minor

Teres Minor is another rotator cuff muscle that not only stabilizes the shoulder joint but also externally rotates the arm.

Scorpion Pose

Anterior Deltoid:

Anterior

Anterior Deltoid causes the flexion of the arm anteriorly and it will be assisting only when getting into the position of Scorpion.

Middle Deltoid Scorpion Pose:

Middle Deltoid

Middle Deltoid helps in abduction of the arm and also assisting only when getting into position.

Also Read more about: https://easyflexibilityblog.com/category/splits/

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